University of California Los

Overview

Imagine that you work for a consulting firm that offers information  technology and database services. Part of its core services is to  optimize and offer streamlined solutions for efficiency. In this  scenario, your firm has been awarded a contract to implement a new  personnel system for a government agency. This government agency has  requested an optimized data repository for its system, which will enable  the management staff to perform essential human resources (HR) duties  along with the capability to produce ad hoc reporting features for  various departments. They look forward to holding data that will allow  them to perform HR core functions such as hiring, promotions, policy  enforcement, benefits management, and training.

Instructions

Using this scenario, write a 3–4 page paper in which you:

  • Determine the steps in the development of an effective entity  relationship model (ERM) diagram and determine the possible iterative  steps and factors that one must consider in this process, with  consideration of the HR core functions and responsibilities of the  client.
  • Analyze the risks that can occur if any of the developmental or iterative steps of creating an ERM diagram are not performed.
  • Select and rank at least five entities that would be required for the development of the data repositories.
  • Specify the components that would be required to hold time-variant data for policy enforcement and training management.
  • Diagram a possible 1:M solution that will hold salary history  data, job history, and training history for each employee through the  use of graphical tools. Note: The graphically depicted solution is not  included in the required page length.
  • Plan each step of the normalization process to ensure the 3NF  level of normalization using the selected five entities of the personnel  database solution. Document each step of the process and justify your  assumptions in the process.
  • Diagram at least five possible entities that will be required to sustain a personnel solution. (Note: The graphically depicted solution is not included in the required page length.) The diagram should include the following:     
    • Dependency diagrams.
    • Multivalued dependencies.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Drawing on popular and industrial sources, examine the marketing campaign for a recent or current film release and draw some conclusions about how the marketing campaign contributed to the relative success or failure of the film to connect with audiences (and make money). In your essay be sure to spend at least 1 paragraph focusing on one of the marketing materials from the film (a poster, trailer, etc) and to use five sources from outside of course readings. Elaborations and clarifications below:\

Format:

  • 4-6 pages (1400-2100 words), 1” margins, 12 pt. Times New Roman (or similar) font, double-spaced, with no extra spaces between paragraphs)
  • PLUS a bibliography that must include at least five references (bibliography doesn’t count toward the 4-6 pages).
  • APA, MLA or Chicago Style are acceptable so long as one of them is used consistently throughout. Include a title for your paper.

Instructions:

Drawing on popular and industrial sources, examine the marketing campaign for a recent or current film release and draw some conclusions about how the marketing campaign contributed to the relative success or failure of the film to connect with audiences (and make money). In your essay be sure to spend at least 1 paragraph focusing on one of the marketing materials from the film (a poster, trailer, etc) and to use five sources from outside of course readings. Elaborations and clarifications below:

Selecting a film:

  • Do not write about The Farewell as we discussed that film’s marketing in class.
  • For our purposes, “recent” = a film released in theaters in the U.S. in the last 10 years (2011 and after). A slightly earlier film might be allowable with Prof. Hill’s or Nikki’s approval.
  • You may want to research films first (at some of the trade sites below) to see how much information is available about the film’s marketing and production history; bigger budget films, films that become big hits, highly awarded films and controversial or hotly anticipated films will be easier to research than obscure titles.
  • You might also search for marketing materials online (trailers, appearances by stars, key art, etc) to see which film might give you the most to talk about or which marketing campaign most interests you.

Researching the film:

Research your film in trade and other film-related publications. To find sources, you can use the library’s article databases to search for pertinent articles in industry periodicals or major news outlets. The most important for this paper will likely be the industry trades:

  • Variety
  • The Hollywood Reporter
  • Deadline Hollywood
  • Media Week
  • Broadcasting and Cable
  • Advertising Age
  • (lexisnexis periodicals searches can also help find more of this types of coverage)

You may also find some relevant analysis in more mainstream news outlets – look for substantive articles about the film or its production, rather than stubs or glowing reviews that may be more promotional. The most likely to have relevant coverage are:

  • The New York Times
  • The Los Angeles Times
  • Vanity Fair
  • The Atlantic
  • (and similar)

You may also find scholarly books and periodicals about certain films, types of films, filmmakers or technologies in:

  • JStor
  • Proquest
  • Project Muse
  • (and similar)

You may also cite marketing materials for the film. You may cite as many as you like, but only ONE will count toward your 5 sources (mostly the sources should be trade articles)

Preparing to Write

After reviewing trade reporting, marketing materials, and other available info from before and during the film’s release, consider the following questions. As always, depending on the film you choose, some of these questions will be more important and applicable than others, so consider all of them, but if the marketing budget for your film is not publicly available, for example, you will set that aside:

  • How do you think the film was positioned and for which audiences? How did this positioning dictate/affect the overall marketing strategy?
  • How important was the domestic versus international audience?
  • Were outside firms working on the selling of the film? If so, what were their roles in the film’s marketing.
  • If it’s possible to determine (and it may not be, or there may be partial information available), how much was spent on marketing the film and where was it spent?
  • How were new and social media used (or not used, if that’s the case)?
  • If the film faced negative press on social media or due to a breaking scandal, you may also consider how that worked for/against the film.

Writing the Paper

Once you’ve considered these questions, write your essay on the forms marketing took for this particular film and whether/how you think that contributed to the film’s relative success or failure in connecting with an audience (box office or ratings, critical reception, general audience reception may all be considered here as evidence). Include in your discussion textual analyses of at least one of the forms of advertising. For example, you might analyze the film’s trailer, poster or billboard campaign and what those images and words communicate about the film, key players, or the studio.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University Of California Los

complete the following MCQ

Q6

Overt prestige is associated with the speech of speakers Mainstream American English

Choice 1 of 2:True

Choice 2 of 2:False

Q221 Point

A language could avoid being extremely endangered if it’s used for a specific purpose (e.g., medicine) even though it is not passed on by generations.

Choice 1 of 2:True

Choice 2 of 2:False

Q231 Point

One of the reasons for the public outrage about the Ebonics controversy was due to the misconstrued message that:

Choice 1 of 4:Standard English was used in classrooms

Choice 2 of 4:A stigmatized variety to be used in classroom instruction

Choice 3 of 4:African American English was already being taught in the classroom

Choice 4 of 4:None of the above

Q241 Point

African American English (AAE) is a system that:

Choice 1 of 5:Should be classified as “slang” rather than as a “dialect”

Choice 2 of 5:Is exactly like standard English except for three ungrammatical rules

Choice 3 of 5:Differs from other dialects in regular and rule-governed ways

Choice 4 of 5:Linguists agree originated in west Africa

Choice 5 of 5:Is spoken only by African Americans in the South

Q281 Point

A double negative construction is:

Choice 1 of 4:Logical; the two negatives determine a positive outcome.

Choice 2 of 4:It shows that the speaker is uneducated.

Choice 3 of 4:It shows that the speaker is illogical.

Choice 4 of 4:None of the above.

Q291 Point

Which of the following is NOT true of spontaneous code switching in spoken language?

Choice 1 of 4:It is evidence that bilingual speakers do not have command of any language

Choice 2 of 4:It maintains the grammatical rules of each language

Choice 3 of 4:It retains easily identifiable chunks of discourse

Choice 4 of 4:It forms part of the basic competence of bilingual speakers

Q301 Point

In Kenya, Swahili is spoken among a significant part of the population, used in legal and government documents, in classrooms, and creates solidarity among citizens. This signifies that in Kenya, Swahili is a(n):

Choice 1 of 4:National language

Choice 2 of 4:Official language

Choice 3 of 4:Both National and Official language

Choice 4 of 4:None of the above

Q331 Point

Which of the following contributed to a uniquely American brand of English?

Choice 1 of 4:Language contact

Choice 2 of 4:Borrowings from other languages for names of new objects, plants, and animals

Choice 3 of 4:Early Americans wanted to indicate their political separation from Britain through their language

Choice 4 of 4:All of these

Q351 Point

What is Oralism?

Choice 1 of 4:The study of the sounds and sound patterns of languages

Choice 2 of 4:An attitude about whether children should be taught more than one language from birth

Choice 3 of 4:A method of teaching immigrants English most often used during the 19th century

Choice 4 of 4:A methodology of teaching deaf children to only speak and not use sign language

Q371 Point

All Asian Languages:

Choice 1 of 4:Have the same word order (Subject Verb Object)

Choice 2 of 4:Use logographic writing systems

Choice 3 of 4:Are mutually intelligible

Choice 4 of 4:None of the above

Q381 Point

Thomas Gallaudet:

Choice 1 of 4:Started the first bilingual education program in California

Choice 2 of 4:Wrote about the loss of heritage languages in the Asian immigrant population

Choice 3 of 4:Started the first American deaf school

Choice 4 of 4:Is one of the founders of the English Only movement

Q391 Point

Creolization involves the linguistic expansion of a Pidgin.

Choice 1 of 2:True

Choice 2 of 2:False

Q401 Point

Creole languages can be characterized as NOT having native speakers.

Choice 1 of 2:True

Choice 2 of 2:False 

Q41

5 Points

What have you learned from this course that can be applied to your everyday life in a meaningful way? Limit your answer to 250 words – give three examples.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

I’m working on a communications writing question and need a sample draft to help me learn.

The final version of your research paper should be 2000-2500 words long (8-10 pages double-spaced), excluding a brief personal reflection section and bibliography. The final paper should integrate comments and suggestions from the draft version of the paper. It should include a complete bibliography that includes at least 12 sources, 6 of which need to be from formal, academic, peer-reviewed books and journals. The others could be from reputed journalistic sources, trade publications, or websites.

The paper should include the following sections.

1. An introduction in which you clearly explain your topic, why it is significant and relevant, and provide some context about the topic.

2. Research Questions: Clearly identify 2-6 questions you are asking about your topic, and which form the basis for your research.

3. Theoretical Context: Identify how your topics and question relate to 2-4 theories or key concepts from the course.

4. Methods: Explain the methods you used to gather information for your paper.

5. Analysis: this will constitute the most substantial part of your paper, and should be divided into further sections that identify your main themes and arguments.

6. Conclusion: What are your key findings? What is the major conclusion you’ve drawn from your research? Summarize as clearly and cogently as possible.

7. Recommendations: What further research should be done into the topic (that you were not able to do given limited time and resources). You could also make recommendations for changes in policy or regulations in this section.

8. Personal Reflection: Your personal reflection should include anything you have learnt from doing your research: in terms of the topic, but also in terms of the research process. What did you learn about writing? What was the hardest part? What skills and knowledge have you gained that you didn’t have before? What would you do differently next time.

9. Bibliography.

This is a draft of the final research paper.

Please follow the guidelines outlined under Research Paper Final Version. The draft should be as complete as possible, and should include the different sections as outlined in the guidelines for the final draft version. It should be a minimum of 6 double-spaced pages in length. The draft will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

1. Introduction/Topic Explanation/Clarity of Research Questions

Is the topic relevant, clearly explained and contextualized? Do the research questions align well with the topic?

2. Research and Analysis

Has substantive research been conducted on the topic? Does the paper make strong arguments based on the research, and connect data back to the topic in question?

3. Writing and Grammar

Is the writing clear and cogent, in appropriate academic style? Does the paper have a structure that aligns with assignment guidelines?

4. References

Does the paper incorporate an adequate number of appropriate sources? Are they formatted correctly using a consistent citation style?

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

you will write a 4+ page essay (double spaced, 12 point font) in which you discuss how poverty is represented in at least one film from outside of this class. You can write solely on another film, or compare a class film to another film.

Your essay should have a thought-provoking title, present a clear thesis statement that sets forth an argument, and a well-organized body that includes specific examples from the film. You need to discuss the narrative of the film and the use of specific film techniques. You are also strongly encouraged to refer to one or more of the readings from this class as you analyze the film and support your argument.

I’m very open about the film you choose for this essay. It can be a U.S. film or an international film, a contemporary film or a classic film, a fictional film or a documentary. You will have to track down the film on your own, which may limit your options. Be sure to check Just Watch to find out where films are available for free and/or through subscription services (Netflix, Amazon Prime, etc.). Here are some possibilities, but you are not limited to these:

  • Angela’s Ashes
  • Bastard out of Carolina
  • Beasts of the Southern Wild
  • The Blind Side
  • Born into Brothels
  • Boyz n the Hood
  • Children of Heaven
  • The Color Purple
  • The Florida Project
  • The Glass Castle
  • Grapes of Wrath
  • Harlan County, USA
  • Hidden in America
  • Hoop Dreams
  • Hunger Games
  • Into the Furnace
  • Joker
  • Maid – this is a new Netflix series; watch at least the first two episodes (though I think you’ll end up watching the whole series!)
  • Modern Times
  • Norma Rae
  • Parasite (winner of the 2020 Academy Award for Best Picture)
  • Pursuit of Happyness
  • Roger and Me
  • Roma
  • Salt of the Earth
  • Slumdog Millionaire
  • Stand and Deliver
  • Trash

Here are some possible topics you could examine in your film. Again, you are not limited to these options.

    • region and poverty (particular challenges of poverty in rural or urban or suburban spaces)
    • race/ethnicity and poverty
    • gender and poverty
    • disability and poverty
    • children/teens and poverty
    • crime and poverty
    • education and poverty
    • violence (domestic violence, generational cycles of violence) and/or abuse (physical, sexual, psychological) and poverty)
    • substance abuse and poverty
    • the role community/family/friends
    • themes of resilience and survival
    • journeys (literal journeys, emotional/psychological journeys)
    • how the films humanize poverty and impoverished people
    • how the films perpetuate stereotypes of poverty and/or of certain cultures/subcultures

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Watch a film. Choose a film that has some “meat” to it. You want to choose a film that shows some in depth relationship dynamics. Some examples are Crash, the Farewell, Yesterday, Notting Hill, Apollo 13, Forrest Gump, Sideways. Please note that some of these movies are rated R and not NSFW (and in front of children) so carefully choose for yourself. 

Watch the film with a critical eye.  Think of the concepts that we have learned in class.  Draw upon the knowledge from our modules, the textbook, and our discussions.  Complete the 4 questions. 

Each question should be answered with a paragraph of at least 6 sentences. There should not be any one-sentence answers.  Your answers may be more than one paragraph. each answer should be at least 400 words. There is a lot to unpack in each prompt.

1) What was the role of the perception process for the characters in the movie? In other words, why are they seeing the situation in the way that they are? What are the elements of the perception process? Remember-selection-organization-interpretation. What impacts this process?

2) How did the filmmaker use nonverbal communication to establish the mood of the film? For example, how did the soundtrack contribute to the message of the movie? What kind of lighting did the director use to establish the message of the movie? How did the actors use nonverbal communication (touch, personal space, paralanguage, etc) 

3) What character did you have empathy for or identify with and why?

4) Identify three concepts from the reading or discussion as they appear in the film. 1) Define and describe the concept and 2) explain how a particular scene or theme in the movie illustrated that concept. 

Three concepts

1)

2)

3)

Answer the prompts. Remember to have a fully developed paragraph for your answers. 

PreviousNext

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

After your presentations and debates, each student needs to upload a brief document (use DOC or PDF format to upload to Canvas) that states your name and student ID#, picks one representative quote (a different one for each group member!) from one of the assigned readings (not from the listicles below but from the weekly assigned readings related to these topics), followed by one sentence explaining that quote in your own words, and one or two sentences providing your argument or spin on this quote and its importance.

I attached our groups powerpoint. Please check. For this assignment, just write about 200 words.

Group 2 will consider (three or more) games based on a film:

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Discussion 1: Physician-Assisted Suicide

Death is defined as the cessation of (1) heartbeat, (2) breathing, and (3) electrical activity in the brain. It is possible for death to be postponed through life support; death can also be accelerated through refusing food and water, which are things needed for survival. A “good” death is considered one that includes physical comfort, support from loved ones, acceptance, and adequate medical care.

A relevant issue to consider is the topic of euthanasia, which refers to the act of painlessly ending the lives of persons who are suffering from incurable diseases or have severe disabilities. Another term used for euthanasia is mercy killing. In considering euthanasia within the context of the lifespan, what are our rights at the end of our lives? What are the laws in the United States and other countries? Where does public opinion stand on the issue?

There are three types of euthanasia, and the distinction between each is very important:

  1. Active euthanasia involves deliberately and directly causing a person’s death. This can be done, for example, by administering a lethal dose of drugs. The ethics of active euthanasia are hotly contested.
  2. Passive euthanasia involves allowing a terminally ill person to die of natural causes by withholding lifesaving treatments. This can be done, for example, by taking someone off of life support. In the United States today, there is a trend toward acceptance of passive euthanasia.
  3. Assisted suicide, which is usually “assisted” by a physician, lies somewhere in the middle. It does not involve actively killing someone, but it does involve making available to a person who wishes to die the means by which she or he may do so.

Assisted suicide is illegal in most states of the United States (as of 2017), except Montana, Washington, Vermont, California, Oregon, Colorado, and Washington, DC. Attempts to legalize assisted suicide, however, have resulted in many legislative bills within individual states over the past 20 years.

Oregon was the first state to make physician-assisted suicide legal when it passed the Death With Dignity Act in 1997. The Death With Dignity Act allows terminally ill Oregonians to end their lives through the voluntary self-administration of lethal medications expressly prescribed by a physician for that purpose. It is up to qualified patients and licensed physicians to implement the act on an individual basis. Doctors must report when it is done so that the state can keep track of its frequency.

To qualify for Death With Dignity, a patient must be:

  1. 18 years of age or older
  2. A resident of Oregon
  3. Capable of making and communicating health care decisions for himself/herself
  4. Diagnosed with a terminal illness that will lead to death within six (6) months

Again, it is up to the attending physician to determine whether these criteria have been met. The patient must then find another doctor licensed to practice medicine in Oregon who is willing to give them the life-ending drugs. Not all physicians are willing to administer these drugs to patients, even if they do meet the above criteria. The law does not require the presence of a physician when a patient takes lethal medication. A physician may be present if a patient wishes it, as long as the physician does not administer the medication himself/herself.

For this Discussion, you analyze the Death With Dignity movement through a cultural lens. You examine cross-cultural perspectives on death and dying and use them to make an evaluation about whether a chosen culture would likely be supportive of assisted suicide.

To Prepare:

  • Choose one culture and research that culture’s perspectives on death, dying, and assisted suicide. Research any applicable laws as well.

By Day 3

Post the name of the culture you selected and a description of that culture’s perspectives on dying in general. Given those beliefs and attitudes, would this culture likely be supportive of assisted suicide? Support your argument with scholarly references to the literature.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University Of California Los

In this assignment, you will create a timeline of important milestones or events in the history of European exploration in the Americas. You’ll also write brief explanations for why each of the events you identify is significant.

First, choose one of the following European powers to use as the basis of your assignment: Spain, England, or France. Next, identify the five events or milestones in that nation’s efforts at exploration in the Americas and place them on a timeline using the drawing tools in Microsoft Word.

After you have finalized your timeline, write a 100- to 150-word paragraph for each of the milestones you identified in your timeline. Each of your 5 paragraphs should do the following:

  • Give a summary or overview of the event or milestone.
  • Explain why you believe this event belongs in the top five most important moments in the country’s efforts at exploration.

Generic Assignment Rubric

Generic Assignment Rubric

Assignment TasksPurposefully addresses all tasks or directions in the assignment.

40

Exemplary- Purposefully addresses all tasks or directions in the assignment.

30

Proficient- Purposefully addresses most tasks or directions in the assignment. Needs further work.

10

Basic- Fails to address most tasks or directions in the assignment.

0

No-Submission- The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components outlined in the prompt.

40

Concepts and SkillsDemonstrates understanding or mastery of concepts addressed in the assignment.

40

Exemplary- Demonstrates understanding or mastery of concepts addressed in the assignment.

30

Proficient- Demonstrates some understanding or mastery of concepts addresed in the assignment. Needs further work.

10

Basic- Demonstrates little understanding of mastery of concepts addressed in the assignment.

0

No-Submission- The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components outlined in the prompt.

40

LanguageComfortable command of the language, makes precise word choices, and shows few – if any -errors in usage or mechanics.

20

Exemplary- Comfortable command of the language, makes precise word choices, and shows few – if any -errors in usage or mechanics.

15

Proficient- Word choices are precise, though there are some errors in usage or mechanics; few are significant.

5

Basic- Uses standard diction and appropriate word choices, but there may be a pattern of minor errors accompanied by a few significant errors in usage or mechanics.

0

No-Submission- The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components outlined in the prompt.

20

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

I’m working on a statistics multi-part question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.

1). Confidence Intervals: Determine 95% confidence interval for the true proportion of
successes in each of the following scenarios:
a. We conduct 100 trials and observe 62 successes.
b. We conduct 200 trials and observe 124 successes.
c. We conduct 600 trials and observe 372 successes.
What do you notice about the confidence intervals as the sample size increases? How is this
connected to the Law of Large Numbers?
2). Comparing Service Times
a. The drive-through service times were recorded for 52 randomly selected customers at a
Burger King restaurant. Those times had a mean of 181.3 sec and a standard deviation
of 82.2 sec. Construct a 95% confidence interval estimate of the population mean.
b. The drive-through service times were recorded for 95 randomly selected customers at a
McDonald’s restaurant Those times had a mean of 127.8 sec and a standard deviation
of 60.6 sec. Construct a 95% confidence interval estimate of the population mean.
c. Compare and interpret the results. Does it appear that either restaurant has better
performance. Why or why not?
3). Sales: your company wants to improve sales. Past sales data indicate that the
average sale was $100 per transaction. After training your sales force, recent sales data
(taken from a sample of 25 salesmen) indicates an average sale of $130, with a
standard deviation of $15. Did the training work? Test your hypothesis at a 5%
significance level.
4). Sleep: We want to test whether the mean amount that college students sleep exceeds the
recommended minimum of 7 hours per night. A researcher surveys 1550 college students and
finds the mean to be 6.83 hours with a standard deviation of .23 hours.
a. What specifically was the data collected in the study?
b. Is this data qualitative or quantitative?
c. What command would you do in StatCrunch? Z-stat, T-stat, Proportion stat
d. State the exact sentence in the problem that indicates the direction of the symbol
that will be used in Ha. Will the symbol be <, > or ≠?
e. State the null and alternative hypotheses (Ho and Ha) in symbol form.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

In order to write a case study paper, you must carefully address a number of sections in a specific order with specific information contained in each. The guideline below outlines each of those sections.

-Create a case study. A patient with a cultural, ethnic, and racial background- including height weight and family health history, and any other health issues the patient has. The patient comes in bc of chest pain and dyspnea and other symptoms and signs of plaque in the artery- diagnosed with high ldl and low hdl leading to plaque buildup and atherosclerosis that can be dangerous and life-threatening. Discuss how levels of LDL and HDL can affect a person’s health. See how to diagnose the patient and figure out what the best treatment is for the patient and his history. Discuss why you think this is the best way to help the patient.

Section

Information to Include

Introduction (patient and problem)

  • Explain who the patient is (Age, gender, etc.)
  • Explain what the problem is (What was he/she diagnosed with, or what happened?)
  • Introduce your main argument (What should you as a nurse focus on or do?)

Pathophysiology

  • Explain the disease (What are the symptoms? What causes it?)

History

  • Explain what health problems the patient has (Has she/he been diagnosed with other diseases?)
  • Detail any and all previous treatments (Has she/he had any prior surgeries or is he/she on medication?)

Nursing Physical Assessment

  • List all the patient’s health stats in sentences with specific numbers/levels (Blood pressure, bowel sounds, ambulation, etc.)

Related Treatments

  • Explain what treatments the patient is receiving because of his/her disease

Nursing Diagnosis & Patient Goal

  • Explain what your nursing diagnosis is (What is the main problem for this patient? What need to be addressed?)
  • Explain what your goal is for helping the patient recover (What do you want to change for the patient?)

Nursing Interventions

  • Explain how you will accomplish your nursing goals, and support this with citations (Reference the literature)

Evaluation

  • Explain how effective the nursing intervention was (What happened after your nursing intervention? Did the patient get better?)

Recommendations

  • Explain what the patient or nurse should do in the future to continue recovery/improvement

Your paper should be 8 pages (one-page references and one cover page) in length in APA format.

  • Make sure to integrate citations into all of your paper
  • Support all claims of what the disease is, why it occurs and how to treat it with references to the literature on this disease
  • Always use citations for information that you learned from a book or article; if you do not cite it, you are telling your reader that YOU discovered that information (how to treat the disease, etc.)
  • The introduction summarizes the case comprehensively and prepares the reader for the remainder of the paper. Identifies and thoroughly explains the pathogenesis of the disease topic. Information is scientifically sound, thorough, supported and sufficient.
  • Provides a detailed patient history, physical assessment findings, treatment, and related treatments for the disease topic. Information is scientifically sound, thorough, supported and sufficient.
  • Provides thorough and detailed nursing diagnosis and patient goal. Information is scientifically sound, supported and sufficient.
  • Thoroughly details the nursing interventions. Detailed explanation of nursing goals. Rationale is thorough, supported and sufficient.
  • Provides thorough and insightful explanation of the effectiveness of the nursing intervention. Information is scientifically sound, supported and sufficient in detail
  • Provides an overall thorough explanation of patient recommendations. Clinical findings are supported with evidence, compared and rationalized thoroughly. Recommendations for continued recovery/improvement explained and supported.
  • Provided three sources, find at least one more reliable non internet source that you think is helpful.
  • Libby, P., Buring, J. E., Badimon, L., Hansson Göran K, Deanfield, J., Bittencourt Márcio Sommer, Tokgözoğlu Lale, & Lewis, E. F. (2019). Atherosclerosis. Nature Reviews Disease Primers, 5(1), 1–18. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41572-019-0106-z
  • Rivera, J. J., Cury, R., Blumenthal, R., Nadruz-Junior, W., Agatston, A., Figueiredo, V. N., Nasir, K., & Sposito, A. C. (2015). Low hdl cholesterol but not high ldl cholesterol is independently associated with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in healthy octogenarians. Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, 27(1), 61–67. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40520-014-0249-4
  • Ragbir, S., & Farmer, J. A. (2010). Dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein and atherosclerosis. Current Atherosclerosis Reports, 12(5), 343–348. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11883-010-0091-x

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Since the late 1950s, the number of beds housing the mentally ill have reduced significantly.  This has been called deinstitutionalization and has had many intended and many unintended consequences.  You are to provide a chronology of what has happened to the mentally ill requiring treatment since the late 1950’s, why it has occurred and the result of how the mentally ill have been treated.  It is important to provide an analysis of where the deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill from primarily state hospitals has taken the our society.  Specifically, when addressing criminal justice issues, how has the deinstitutionalization of state hospitals specifically impacted the system.  It is to provide a complete analysis.

This is a hypothetical question.  Many persons who are mentally ill have ended up in confinement. What is your supposition as to why they have ended up in custody.  How many persons both male and female have ended up in custody. What treatment are the persons  who have been diagnosed with mentally ill provided while in custody.   What treatment should confinement facilities provide the persons who are in custody and diagnosed with mental illness.  Do most of the mentally ill persons get the treatment you think they should receive?  If not, why does this not occur?  What would need to happen for these offenders to get the treatment they need.  

  1. North Carolina has some specific requirements regarding involuntary commitments.  Provide a synopsis of the process in North Carolina.  What are some of the barriers to involuntary commitments.  What is the overall reason for involuntary commitments to exist.  And why are there so many barriers for persons to prevail in successfully petitioning for an involuntary commitment.  If the Court grants a petition for an involuntary commitment what is often the biggest issue in providing for the commitment.  In looking at bedspace so some research and determine how many treatment beds verses forensic beds are available in North Carolina?  

Using all of the material at your disposal, including the recently published Daniel Mears article, what is the impact of restrictive housing in managing mentally ill offenders in prison.  What are the issues of having someone with mental illness being placed in restrictive housing when they have a diagnosis of mental illness and what do many of those who oppose restrictive housing indicate happens to the mental health of any person placed in restrictive housing. Do you not hold the offender accountable?   Thinking about , Farmer vs. Brennan,  how is a prison administrator to manage a person where the population tells the Warden, you need to get that person off the compound before he is hurt.  Does the Warden ignore the population or does he or she put the person in restrictive (protective) custody?  How does the Warden justify either decision?  What are some alternatives to restrictive housing? What is the biggest barrier to implementing some of the alternatives mentioned in the literature.   What do you do in this particular case and what are some alternatives you may choose to use?  Remember to provide empirical evidence for your decision.  There are many articles  regarding restrictive housing available in the supplemental readings.  

  1. We have discussed the factor Medicaid played in the deinstitutionalization of mental health beds in this country.  Why was and is this such a factor in making decisions to remove the number of mental health beds available in any jurisdiction in the United States.  In North Carolina specifically, what is the grade provided regarding access to mental health treatment?  You need to be specific and provide information concerning the grade and why it was provided.  Do you agree or disagree with the grade and why?

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Solow Model Excel Assignment

Goals of the Assignment

There are two main goals for this assignment. First, it is meant to help improve your

understanding of the mechanics of the Solow growth model that we covered in the first

half of the class and to make sure you don’t forget about it before the final. Second,

since many jobs for economics majors require at least a basic knowledge of Microsoft

Excel, it is also meant to give you some practice with some of Excel’s basic features. If

you do not have access to Excel, Google sheets will also work as a free alternative.

The Assignment

For this assignment, we will be simulating a Solow Growth Model in an Excel

spreadsheet. To do this, please try follow these steps.

1. Set up the parameters of the model: In a box on your excel sheet, set input the

following numbers as values for each parameter. We will use numbers on your

student ID to give each of you a unique setup (if any number is a 0, skip it and

move to the next number). We will assume a Cobb-Douglas production function

a) Set capital’s share of income where X is the first number on your

student ID

b) Set the saving rate where X is the second number of your student ID

c) Set the depreciation rate where X is the third number of your student

ID

d) Set the population growth rate where X is the fourth number of your

student ID

e) Set the technology growth rate where X is the fifth number of your

student ID. Calculate using your values for and .

2. Calculate steady state capital per effective worker, output per effective worker, and

consumption per effective worker by hand.

3. Set the initial level of technology and . Set equal to half its

steady state value that you calculated in 2. Put these three values in the first row of

three separate columns in your spreadsheet.

4. Using Excel formulas (i.e. not calculating by hand), calculate , , , , ,

, and putting each in the first row of their own column in your spreadsheet

(you should now have 11 columns filled in total). You should be able to calculate all

of these variables using , , , and parameters.

5. Using the growth rates you set in part 1, use an Excel formula to calculate and

for 100 periods (so you should have 100 rows filled in with these values)

6. Using the law of motion for capital per effective worker, calculate for 100 periods

7. Calculate values for the other 8 variables for 100 periods (carrying formulas down).

8. From the 100 values you have generated, create graphs of

a) Capital per effective worker (include a dashed line at the steady state level of

capital that you calculated in 2)

b) The natural log of capital per worker

c) The natural log of aggregate capital

d) The growth rate of capital per worker and aggregate capital (you can use the

difference in the logs as an approximation for the growth rate)

9. Copy the spreadsheet you have created into a new sheet. After period 100, change

the saving rate to the value that optimizes steady state consumption (if you are

already at this value, choose an arbitrary new value between 0 and 1). Using the

new saving rate, starting in period 100, calculate values for all of your variables for

100 more periods (so you will now have 200 total values for each variable). Create a

graph for the following variables (for these graphs, start from period 50, so you will

plot t=50 to t=200). For each graph, include a dashed line at both the original and

new steady state values (calculate these by hand)

a) Capital per effective worker

b) Output per effective worker

c) Consumption per effective worker

10. Copy the original spreadsheet again onto a third sheet. Now double . Using the

new growth rate, starting in period 100 calculate values for all of your variables

forward to period 200. Create graphs (again starting in period 50) for

a) Output per effective worker (include dashed lines at both the original and new

steady states))

b) The natural log of output per worker

c) The natural log of aggregate output

d) The growth rate of output per worker and aggregate output (again using the

difference in logs)

11. You should now have 13 graphs. Put these together into a single document (Word,

google docs, powerpoint slides, anything works as long as the final format can be a

pdf), including a brief description (a few sentences) explaining what is happening in

each of the three parts (i.e. a few sentences each for step 8, step 9, and step 10).

Requirements/Tips/Grading

1. Your graphs should include labeled axes and a title. If you have multiple lines on the

graph (for graphs where you plot a steady state), include a legend making it clear

what each line represents.

2. You must make at least some changes to the default Excel (or whatever program

you use) style (e.g. change the color, font, sizes of the lines, gridlines, etc.). This is

just to practice making Excel graphs. Don’t go overboard with the changes – make

sure everything still looks clean.

3. Make sure your final document with graphs and descriptions looks professional and

readable. If it is hard for the grader to figure out what you are trying to show you

won’t get as high a score

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Section 2.2: 1, 10

Section 2.3: 4

Section 2.4: 2

Section 2.5: 3

Section 2.7: 6

Exercise A

Write the following dierential equations as a rst order autonomous ODE system:

(a) x 􀀀 sin(x_ ) + x = 0

(b) x + t

p

1 + x2 = 3

Exercise B

For r; x0; v0 2 R nd the explicit solutions x(t) of the following dierential equations:

(a) x_ = rx, x(0) = x0,

(b) x_ = rx2, x(0) = x0,

(c) x_ = rx3, x(0) = x0,

(d) x + x_ 􀀀 2x = 0, x(0) = x0 and x_ (0) = v0:

Analyze the following equations graphically. In each case, sketch the vector field

on the real line, find all the fixed points, classify their stability, and sketch the

graph of x ( t ) for different initial conditions. Then try for a few minutes to obtain

the analytical solution for x ( t ); if you get stuck, don’t try for too long since in several

cases it’s impossible to solve the equation in closed form!

2.2.1 x􀀅 = 4×2 −16

2.2.10 (Fixed points) For each of (a)–(e), find an equation x􀀅 􀀞 f (x) with the

stated properties, or if there are no examples, explain why not. (In all cases, assume

that f ( x ) is a smooth function.)

a) Every real number is a fixed point.

b) Every integer is a fixed point, and there are no others.

c) There are precisely three fixed points, and all of them are stable.

d) There are no fixed points.

e) There are precisely 100 fixed points.

2.3.4 (The Allee effect) For certain species of organisms, the effective growth

rate N􀀅 N is highest at intermediate N. This is called the Allee effect (Edelstein–

Keshet 1988). For example, imagine that it is too hard to find mates when N is very

small, and there is too much competition for food and other resources when N is

large.

a) Show that N􀀅 N = r−a(N −b)2 provides an example of the Allee effect, if r, a,

and b satisfy certain constraints, to be determined.

b) Find all the fixed points of the system and classify their stability.

c) Sketch the solutions N ( t ) for different initial conditions.

d) Compare the solutions N ( t ) to those found for the logistic equation. What are

the qualitative differences, if any?

Use linear stability analysis to classify the fixed points of the following systems.

If linear stability analysis fails because f ′(x∗)􀀞 0, use a graphical argument to

decide the stability.

2.4.2 x􀀅 = x(1−x)(2−x)

2.5.3 Consider the equation x􀀅 = rx+x3 , where r 􀀟 0 is fixed. Show that x ( t ) 􀁬

􀁯􀁤 in finite time, starting from any initial condition x0 􀁶 0.

For each of the following vector fields, plot the potential function V ( x ) and identify

all the equilibrium points and their stability.

2.7.6 x􀀅 = r+x−x3 , for various values of r.

Exercise A

Write the following dierential equations as a rst order autonomous ODE system:

(a) x .. sin(x_ ) + x = 0

(b) x + t

p

1 + x2 = 3

Exercise B

For r; x0; v0 2 R nd the explicit solutions x(t) of the following dierential equations:

(a) x_ = rx, x(0) = x0,

(b) x_ = rx2, x(0) = x0,

(c) x_ = rx3, x(0) = x0,

(d) x + x_ .. 2x = 0, x(0) = x0 and x_ (0) = v0:

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Watch the YouTube videos below that talk about Gullah English, Appalachian English, and Cockney English. (They are 10-20 minutes long, so take some time out to watch all 3 of them.) Listen to the various types of English that are spoken in this country. What sounds familiar to you? What makes them so different? 

R1

The Wikitongues sounds similar to me as I can understand everything the person there is peaking. I feel like I have been exposed to that dialect more than others. Although they have different pronunciations and have other words to mean other stuff, it is easy to understand the meaning. The Cockney Dialect also sounds familiar, but I think that’s because of social media exposure to that dialect. Both Cockney and Wikitongues sound clear, even tho there are things to decipher in some parts of their dialect. The mountain talk definitely sounds strange to me. I think of red necks or hillbillies when they speak. This reminds me of the video lecture on labeling and assuming people can change how we may hear them. I think having this construed image of it made it more difficult to hear them. The ones that I would hear more properly were the ones that dressed professionally. What I noticed in the Mountain video is that their dialect has a lot of words created. At least more than what I have seen in the other video. There are words that I feel like I recognize but with a different meaning—for example, Dopes and Boomer. The aspect that makes it sound different in these dialects is the shortening of sounds and creating new words. I find it fascinating how each dialect is quite different but also similar in some ways. What I wonder is how these dialects will change in 10 years where new speakers of the language bring new words?

2

For Gullah English, everything is completely comprehensible to me. I think the O’s are the vowels that stand out the most to me. For example, when the woman says, “Bone,” it differs from the way I pronounce it. I also notice she pronounces the TH sounds as a single t. I also noticed that she lacks the hard R and pronounces it like the British RP English R (sorry I don’t have the IPA keyboard). At around 13:30 when her accent gets thicker, I can still understand her but I notice the metathesis the module documents were talking about because she says “aks” instead of mainstream English’s “ask.”

For Appalachian English, it sounds like their vowels drag on. English has lots of diphthongs, but I feel like mainstream English’s diphthongs are very subtle. For Appalachian English, you can clearly hear the diphthongs and identify them. For example, at 1:50, when the man says “here” you can hear the “heeaahhheeeer” and all the vowel sounds he makes. I also heard some of the a-prefixing that we learned about in the module documents.

For Cockney English, one thing I noticed was the difference in the way we pronounce “London.” I say Lon-den (like a lion’s den) whereas she says Lon-dun (like dun-dun-dun you’re in trouble). Her vowels also sound less rounded. Also, I know this isn’t related to sounds themselves, but I noticed her mouth is very animated and open. Is this a characteristic for Cockney speakers or is it a personal thing?

For all the different types of English, I’m not really sure what makes them sound familiar to me. I can understand them all perfectly, but I they sound so different to the way I speak. Perhaps it’s the consonants that maintains comprehensibility. However, some consonants are different (like the Gullah woman saying “ting” vs “thing” or “chillen” vs “children”) and I can still understand exactly what they’re saying. 

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

For the ancient Greeks, arete or excellence meant primarily excellence in battle. It was a culture of war and booty. It was a military culture, too, because of the constant threat of takeover by Persia. It stayed free because of a military tactic called the phalanx. As seen below, soldiers stood soldier to soldier, shields up and spears at the ready. It was a formidable defense against any enemy and kept the Athenian peoples safe. But such a defense requires great courage from the men who stood in the line, especially the first line with thousands of soldiers lined up behind them. As one in the first line fell, one from the second line stepped up to fill in the hole. There could be no cowardice, no running away. The safety of all depended upon the courage of all. It is from this beginning that the Greeks formulated the idea of the excellence of character, or arete.Arete is one of the most important concepts to travel through time from Homer to today. It was the foundational belief that made the Athenian culture in Greece what is considered to be the greatest culture in all of human history. And yet, as our reading indicates, arete is simply a belief in ourselves–in our own excellent predispositions which if encouraged and educated, can create successful individuals.

If that sounds to you like the world we live in now, where people develop their talents in order to become successful and prosperous, that would be a mistaken view of the Greek ideal. In addition to excellence, the Greek Homeric ideal stressed many important concepts, like working for the common good, justice, balance, honor, moderation, and hubris. Using only the first chapter in our text,

  • Explain what you take to be that ideal and explain how the concepts just mentioned fit into it.
  • Explain how the idea of hubris characterizes much of Western culture. Give examples.
  • Explain how justice, balance, and honor if accepted would make a difference in culture. What if we all worked for the common good as the Greeks did and not for our individual goods?
  • Is moderation morally necessary today?
  • Might the Homeric ideal be a way to improve American culture? Why do you think so?

Submission:

  • Must be a minimum of 1 and a half pages with standard 1-inch margins in Times New Roman or Garamond font.
  • Must be double-spaced.
  • Must address the topic of the paper with critical thought.
  • Must include in-text citations and references in MLA style.
  • Name, course, and assignment top left.
  • Include a Title.
  • Rubric- Assignment
    标准 等级 得分
    Assignment ideas are stated clearly and easy to understand.
    30
    Exemplary- Ideas are stated clearly and easy to understand.
    20
    Proficient- Ideas are stated clearly and easy to understand with minimal distractions.
    10
    Basic- Writing needs improvement. Ideas were hard to follow and there was no general flow of the topic.
    0
    No-Submission- The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components outlined in the topic.
    30
    此标准已链接至学习结果Purposefully addresses all portions of the topic and has a fully developed thesis.
    30 得分Exemplary- Purposefully addresses all portions of the topic and has a fully developed thesis. 20 得分Proficient- Slightly underdeveloped thesis and purpose. Needs further work. 10 得分Basic- Purpose and thesis are partially underdeveloped. 0 得分No-Submission- The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components outlined in the topic.
    30
    此标准已链接至学习结果Major supporting ideas are thoughtful, readily identifiable and well-developed in unified paragraphs with concrete, substantial and relevant information.
    30 得分Exemplary- Major supporting ideas are thoughtful, readily identifiable and well-developed in unified paragraphs with concrete, substantial and relevant information. 20 得分Proficient-Supporting ideas are relevant and developed in unified paragraphs with substantial information. 10 得分Basic- Supporting ideas are not relevant, and/or paragraphs need to be unified with substantial information. 0 得分No-Submission- The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components outlined in the topic.
    30
    此标准已链接至学习结果Comfortable command of the language, makes precise word choices, and shows few – if any -errors in usage or mechanics.
    10 得分Exemplary- Comfortable command of the language, makes precise word choices, and shows few – if any -errors in usage or mechanics. 5 得分Proficient- Word choices are precise, though there are some errors in usage or mechanics, few are significant. 3 得分Basic- The essay uses standard diction and appropriate word choices, but there may be a pattern of minor errors accompanied by a few significant errors in usage or mechanics. 0 得分No-Submission- The assignment is either nonexistent or lacks the components outlined in the topic.
    10

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

You will be writing a critique of The Next Government of the United States: Why Our Institutions Fail Us and How to Fix Them by Kettl (2009). Your paper should address the issues of leadership, collaboration, networking, and other issues present in the book and in this course.

In your critique you will be synthesizing many of the themes, ideas, and questions that we’ve been addressing throughout this course.

Details

  • Length: 8 pages (exclusive of title and reference page)
  • APA style for all citations
  • Word, 12 point, double-spaced

Rubric for Written Assignments

A (90-100) The essay is exceptional in every way. The essay is well organized and all claims are supported. It begins with a solid introduction, is followed by body paragraphs that contain clear topic sentences with clear and detailed support, and ends with an effective conclusion. Content is thorough and lacking in no area. There are no (or few) errors in tone, format, mechanics, grammar, and content. APA citation and writing conventions are followed virtually error free.

B (80-89) The essay is above adequate in most areas. In the areas where it is not above adequate, it is still entirely acceptable. The majority of the essay is clear, focused, and well detailed, but there may be a few areas requiring further development. While it may contain a few errors with tone, mechanics, grammar, and/or content, these errors are not egregious enough to detract from the overall point presented. APA citation and writing conventions are largely followed with some errors present.

C (70-79) The essay is adequate in most areas but exceptional in none. The writing is clear although lacking in both control and command. Organization may be problematic but can be fixed. The paragraphs provide support but are generally underdeveloped. There may be multiple errors in tone, format, mechanics, grammar, and content, but these errors do not, for the most part, detract from the overall writing. APA citation and writing conventions are not consistently followed.

F (0-69) The essay is lacking in a majority of areas. It is generally unorganized and unfocused. The writing is not clear in a significant portion of the essay. Most of the essay is underdeveloped. There are frequent errors in tone, format, mechanics, grammar, and/or content that distract from the content being provided and understood. There are significant problems throughout the written product. APA citation and writing conventions contain significant errors or is not followed. The failing paper can have a wide range of gradations on the issues mentioned above.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University Of California Los

outline part?

Please submit three ideas outline for your term paper.

Compose complete sentences.

Build an opinion into each idea.

Make sure to keep your topic narrow enough–probably focused on 1-2 branches of the media.

  • Directions:
  • This semester, as we are learning about the different media, we will be discussing many media-related issues–issues such as the increased fragmentation of the media, privacy issues, the impact of convergence, fake news, censorship, and the increased concentration of media ownership.  For this assignment, you will have the opportunity to choose one of these topics—or any others that relate to mass media and society–and make an argument concerning its effects, making sure that you focus on the impact on only one or two branches of the media so that your topic isn’t overly broad. Because writing a term paper can sometimes be overwhelming, we will break this assignment down into smaller components, each with its own deadline. Consult our modules for individual deadlines. 
  • What to do:

Begin to decide what you’d like as your paper topic: Browse your textbook and media clips for potential media issues.  Another good source for topics are the discussion questions at the end of each chapter.  Also, consider some of the topics that I ask you about for happy quizzes.

Once you’ve decided on a topic, find at least six magazine or newspaper articles concerning the particular media issue that you are examining. You may also include sources from books and web sites.  You may not use web sites of questionable legitimacy or advocacy sites. You will be using and citing your chosen sources directly in the body of the paper with a specific citation.

Come up with a working thesis for your essay.

Freewrite on this working thesis. Or try other prewriting techniques, such as brainstorming, listing, clustering, talking with people about your idea, etc.

Write an outline for the essay. This outline should be detailed enough to really guide you through the process of writing the paper; it should, essentially, be a road map.  Be sure to include a section in your outline in which you address the opposition, those people who would potentially disagree with your position:  How will you convince them?

Next, write an ideas draft; this will be sloppy, disorganized, grammatically incorrect–but, hey, at least you’ve got something on paper!

Now, write a rough draft. We will have a peer-response workshop in class for you to get feedback from a few classmates. This will be followed by a citation rough draft (one in which you include all your citations).

  1. You are ready to refine your draft and make it into a product of which you feel proud. Don’t forget to proofread this final draft.
  2. What I’ll be looking for:

A clear, focused thesis that tells the reader what point you’ll be arguing and–very briefly–why you hold the position you do.

Well-developed paragraphs with strong topic sentences.

  1. Lots of evidence, examples, statistics, quotes from experts and other forms of support to back up your claims.
  2. At least six different print sources (books, magazine articles, newspaper articles, or scholarly articles) used and cited in the body of your essay. Yes, it is acceptable to get these print sources from a legitimate Web site, such as the NY Times, etc.)

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Part 1 : M13. Assignment: The Pathos of Nietzsche Life

Nietzsche’s books are full of arrogance and bravado, but underneath all of that was a brilliant, profoundly caring man who was on the one hand very angry at the path taken in philosophy because of Plato, and on the other hand very anxious to put all of that behind us to begin anew to find meaning and value in our lives.  He battled a crippling mental disease from the time he was in his 20s until his death at 55.  He was almost always ill and yet he traveled about Europe finding climates that helped his condition and wrote 15 books.  Very few people read them.  That may have been a good thing; for if they had, his life would no doubt have been in great danger.  People don’t take too kindly to books that ridicule culture and religion as misguided,   Nietzsche’s books are like that.  Today we might compare him to people who  are full of themselves. Behind the pompous mask, was a very serious man with a serious mission; to lead us in a new and better direction.  

Using information from the video below and especially from your reading this week, what direction do you think he wished us to take?  What must we become if we are to save ourselves?

 

Philosophy – Nietzsche. You Tube.  The School of Life.  10 October 2014. 

Part 2 : M13. Discussion: The Trolley Problem

Topic

Could you pull the switch?  And more importantly, should you pull the switch?

Would you sacrifice one person to save five?  Narrated by Eleanor Nelsen. YouTube. Ted-Ed. 12 January 2017. 

As the video explains, as a moral theory, Utilitarianism can be cold-blooded at times, allowing actions that we generally recoil at.  From the reading this week and from the film, explain what Utilitarianism is, and then provide at least three problems with it.  This is an important issue for us, because Utilitarianism is used as moral justification in the US, and the theory’s problems have allowed dubious actions to be considered moral.  

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

The purpose of the content consumption analysis is for you to increase your familiarity with the various kinds of content produced and distributed by public media.

You will need to pick a specific program (listed below) and listen or watch the episodes listed, and then write a paper that answers the following questions:

1 – What is the name of the content?

2 – Provide some background history on it, and explain what the purpose of the content is?

3 – What is the episode about?

4- Who produces the show?

5 – How is it distributed to audiences?

6 – Who do you think the target audience is?

7 – Explain the ways in which you think it offers (or not) something different from the commercial media market.

8 – Explain how you think it enhances the mission of public media.

Upload your paper though the submit assignment button.

The paper should be between 4-6 pages, double spaced. Please include any sources you cite as either footnotes or as references at the end of the paper. If you include references at the end, these should not count in the total page count for your answers.

Suggested content for review – pick one for your paper.

1 – Listen to one hour of Radio Vocalo 

2 – Listen to these two World Cafe interviews:

Don Bryant on the Art of Songwriting 

The Chicks Are Still Speaking Out 

3 -From On The Media: Listen to Making Sense of ‘Cancel Culture’  

4 – Listen to this episode of Ear Hustle: Nobody Comes Back 

5 – Watch: Love, Life & The Virus from Frontline

6 – Watch: The Planets: Saturn from Nova 

7 – Listen to Song Exploder: Black Pumas episode 

8 – Watch: Antiques Roadshow: Cleveland, Hour One 

9 – Listen to this episode of The Ted Radio Hour: The Greater Good 

10 – Read these two articles from Code Switch:

“Hispanic, Latino, or LatinX….Survey Says” 

How DACA has changed the lives of Dreamers 

11 – Listen to “Criminal Justice System & Police” from Radio Milwaukee

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

A well-known pop star, Britney Spears (Links to an external site.), was admitted to Los Angeles’ Cedars-Sinai Medical Center for psychiatric evaluation as part of a child custody dispute with ex-husband Kevin Federline, who temporarily had sole legal and physical custody (Links to an external site.) of the couple’s children. Dr. Phil McGraw, a well-known talk show host and friend of the family, visited Spears in the hospital on January 7th without Spears’ consent. Dr. Phil subsequently released a statement were he said the following:

“meeting with Britney and some of her family members this morning in her room at Cedars leaves me convinced more than ever that she is in dire need of both medical and psychological intervention. She was released moments before my arrival and was packing when I entered the room. We visited for about an hour before I walked with her to her car. I am very concerned for her.” (Harris 2008)

After releasing this statement, a spokesperson for Britney Spears said that he “betrayed her trust” by speaking to the press. Subsequently, his credential as a licensed clinical psychologist in the state of California was questioned. Results of the inquiry found that Dr. Phil was not licensed to practice psychology in the state. He does have a doctorate in clinical psychology and had been licensed in the state of Texas until 2006 when he gave up his license to practice, although he formally stopped practicing clinical psychology in 1990 when he formed a business and subsequently began his television show. Consider the potential ethical issues in this situation.

Utilizing your decision matrix, answer the following questions supporting your reasoning:

  1. Did Dr. Phil have the right to visit Ms. Spears?
  2. Did he have the right to make the statement he did about her condition?
  3. What ethical issues does this situation pose?
  4. What are some of the issues that surface with this case as related to public figures or celebrities as well as patients with behavioral healthcare issues?

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

SECOND EXAM– ORIGINAL THOUGHT QUESTIONS

WRITE TWO ESSAYS (2.5-3 PAGES DOUBLE-SPACED) IN ANSWER TO THE QUESTIONS PROVIDED. BE SURE TO QUOTE FROM THOMPSON, ROHLHEISER AND LADINSKY IN FRAMING YOUR ANSWERS.

SECTION ONE—PERSONAL SPIRITUAL GROWTH

1. Thompson argues for a traditional view of spirituality. She says that true spirituality is a relationship with God focused on the agency and interaction of the Holy Spirit. How do you understand the third person of the Trinity? How do you understand the work of the Holy Spirit– in an individual’s life and in the life of the community of faith? How is the quest to experience the Spirit at the heart of all worship and prayer?

2. “God is not found through addition, but by subtraction. These words by Meister Eckhart frame Thompson’s chapter on “Self-Emptying.” What are some practices you would like to take on to create more inner space for God the Spirit? How could the practice of self-emptying make a positive spiritual difference in your life? Are there any spiritual or psychological dangers involved?

3. Under Spiritual Resources–John of the Cross, there is an exercise to explore a “dark night of the soul” that you have experienced. Thoughtfully complete this exercise in two or three pages.

4. Under Spiritual Resources–Buddhism, there is an exercise to explore a Buddhist approach to a problem you are currently undergoing. Using the Buddhist concepts, analyze and explore what is wrong, work through the Buddhist method of dealing with the problem, and choose a pathway of right speech, right action, right vision, etc. All answers are strictly confidential.

5. Carl Jung, in reference to the shadow, once said “What we don’t deal with, we inevitably afflict on others.” How is this true in your own life? What issues don’t you deal with? What issues do you avoid? How does this impact your life? How does this impact the lives of others around you? Write a personal essay detailing the truth, or untruth, of this statement about the shadow..

6. Write about a mystical experience you have had that satisfies William James’ four criteria of mystical experience. How do you interpret this experience, in hindsight, and what have you done with this experience to carry it forward?.

  1. Write five haikus or short poems about spiritual friendship

SECTION II– CONTEMPORARY SPIRITUALITY AND THEOLOGY

8. Some theologians say that the church has “dumbed down” its approach to the gospel, teaching simple obedience to the church and a moral theology. They allege that the church has abandoned the creative and imaginative teachings of Jesus, especially his 40 parables about life in the kingdom of God. Write a parable or creative story that follows the guidelines of parabolic imagination that Professor Neff spoke of in class (see powerpoint lecture). “The kingdom of heaven is like . . . . or “the reign of God’s gracious love is like” . . . Make sure your story is not a moral lesson, but cuts deeper, making the reader think paradoxically, deeply and seriously!

9. Teresa of Avila and John of the Cross suggested that in order to reach direct union with God, one must distrust all sense knowledge and deny one’s senses. The aim was so the soul can be stripped to its essence and one can enter into the fullness of the Divine-Human relationship. Three hundred years earlier, Hildegard of Bingen taught that the senses and the fully-engaged experience of the body was the holiest pathway to knowing God intimately and experiencing union with the Divine. Which approach do you agree with? How are spiritual people to understand our bodies and our senses? Positively or negatively?

10. Is the Unconscious real? Or just a metaphor, an analogy, a symbol? How is the unconscious an important resource for the development of the whole person? Using Professor Neff’s lecture and powerpoint on the psychology of Carl Jung, write your philosophical and psychological reasons why you agree or disagree with this important concept.

11. “Nada, nada, nada, even on the mountaintop, nada.” These words by John of the Cross indicate a counter-intuitive and direct way to God. How do you view this “negative theology” as an approach to finding God (and being found by God)? How do you understand the value of his theological and spiritual method of embracing“the dark night of the soul”? What spiritual truths can be found when we walk in the dark?

12. How is spiritual friendship the defining issue of our times?

13, Buddhist philosophy stresses detachment, withdrawal, non-action. Jewish, Christian and Islamic theology teaches holy engagement, striving and action to change the world and cooperate with God who is active in history. Both approaches seem contradictory in their aim and intention. Can a person be a faithful Jew and also a practicing Buddhist? A faithful Muslim who also uses Buddhist techniques? A faithful Christian who follows the teachings of the Buddha?

14. Bonhoeffer warned about the dangers of “religion-less Christianity” taking over contemporary culture– he said that people will worship God, Jesus and the Spirit without any meaningful grounding in life-with-others; without any accountability, challenge or support derived from participation in a church; without any tradition or historical belief as a guide. For him, “Christ exists as community; Christ only exists in community.” What do you believe about the necessity and importance of a community to live out a full, vital spiritual existence?

15. Avery Dulles gave six models of the church. The prevailing model, the Institutional Model, is the most antithetical to the biblical understanding. Yet it is the model or metaphor that most Catholics are familiar. How can the Church become more church-like, in the spiritual sense of the word? Detail an educational program to help church members or youth group members rethink their ideas about the church in fresh, creative ways, using other metaphors and models which are more meaningful.

16. What should the Church (or Synagogue or Mosque) teach teen age and college age adults about human sexuality? What should the Church teach about sexual relations? Knowing what Rohlheiser wrote about and Sr. Margaret Farley talked about in the Seven Ethics of Just Love, is there is a vital link between sexuality and spirituality, what should be communicated to teenagers and young adults?

17. What is the heart of Muslim spirituality? What is the beauty of Islamic spirituality?

18. Do you agree or disagree with this quote? “The Christian of the future will be a mystic, or nothing at all.”(Karl Rahner). Why? Why not?

19. Being Catholic is a juggling act. How is this statement true or false? How does a committed Catholic honor the authority of the church within its living tradition, yet at the same time, remain true to one’s own contemporary beliefs, values and experiences? Detail your answer.

20. Marjorie Thompson has written about soul friends and spiritual friends. She believes that soul friends or spiritual friends should be of the same heritage and background of faith; that the living tradition which one commits is full of language and symbolism and experiential learning that another person from a different faith might not be able to appreciate or understand fully. What are the difficulties of interfaith marriage? How might two people from two different faiths navigate love combined with a deep religious commitment? How would they celebrate both faiths? Celebrate the holy days and seasons? Raise their children?

21. You are a seeker and lover of God. You go to different churches but cannot hear your beliefs or feel connected to the people or the mission of the church. You know that a sense of community and belonging is important for you to develop and grow in your spirituality. So you take a leap of faith and decide start your own church. Write about the community of faith you would like to start. What will its beliefs be? How will people connect to each other? What will the primary mission of the community be? Create your own church!

SECTION III– SPIRITUALITY OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

22. Do you agree or disagree with this quote? “My being hungry is a physical issue. My neighbor being hungry is a spiritual issue.” (Nicholas Berdyaev)

23. Write a letter to the pastor or priest or Imam of the church or mosque that you attend. Explain to her or him how the church needs to be better or do better– in worship and prayer, in community building and fellowship, in education and learning, in service and social justice. Be sure to quote from scripture or from one of our textbooks in your letter

24. What’s wrong with men these days? Many religious groups are calling for men to deepen their self-understanding and make commitments to their own self-transformation. Different religious groups have sought, in recent years, to liberate men, forming groups like Promise Keepers and starting the Million Man March. They seek to call men to more accountability to divine standards, as well as to inspire men to be better sons, fathers, husbands, workers, businessmen and community leaders. Assuming women cannot liberate men, what do men need to do to liberate themselves?

25. How is the ecological crisis a spiritual crisis for our times? How is environmental justice an opening and an opportunity for growing closer to God, and, at the same time, building a sense of community among all the world’s peoples.

26. What Catholic Social teaching is most important to you? Why? How would you like to see this teaching implemented and put into practice at city, state, national and global levels? By the church as well as by the government?

27. Three years ago, Pope Francis urged Catholics journeying through the season of Lent to give up “social distancing.” He said that due to the distractions and diversions of our dependency on the cellphone, we are growing more isolated and disconnected with each other. With the Covid-19 virus, we have enforced physical distancing. Assuming we overcome this pandemic, in the USA and globally (a big assumption!), how should we reconnect to each other in the future? Build a greater sense of social solidarity? Reinvigorate our relationships and strengthen our communities? Write out a plan or a vision of a stronger, more connected society.

28. Write a three-page theological or spiritual meditation based on a particular scripture text from Judaism, Christianity or Islam. Or write a spiritual meditation based on the crucifixion and resurrection. How does this text speak to us today? Be sure to cite your sources as well as letting the your particular voice speak.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Section 6.3: 15

Section 6.5: 1, 13

Section 6.6: 1

Section 6.8: 8

Exercise A

Show that the system

x_ = x 􀀀 y 􀀀 x(x2 + y2);

y_ = x + y 􀀀 y(x2 + y2)

is given in polar coordinates (x; y) = (r cos ; r sin ) by

r_ = r(1 􀀀 r2);

_ = 1:

Draw the associated phase portrait.

1

Exercise B

For r < 1 draw the phase portrait of

r_ = 􀀀r;

_ =

1

ln r

:

Calculate the associated vector eld f in cartesian coordinates. Note that (by denition)

f(0; 0) = (0; 0): Show that the phase portrait of the linearization at the origin is the phase

portrait of a stable star.

Remark. In this example f 2 C1(B1(0)) nC2(B1(0)); where B1(0) = f(x; y)jx2+y2 < 1g

is the ball of radius r = 1 around the origin. This example is due to Perron.

Exercise C

(a) Use index theory to show that the system

x_ = x(4 􀀀 y 􀀀 x2);

y_ = y(x 􀀀 1)

has no closed orbit. You may assume that a branch of the unstable manifold of (2; 0)

approaches (1; 3):

(b) Draw a phase portrait with all of the following properties:

(1) it diers from the phase portrait of (a) only for x > 0 and y > 0,

(2) it has a closed orbit,

(3) it has a stable spiral at (1; 3):

6.3.15 Consider the system r..= r(1.r2 ), …. =1.cos.. where r, .. represent polar

coordinates. Sketch the phase portrait and thereby show that the fixed point

r* .. 1, ..* .. 0 is attracting but not Liapunov stable.

6.5.1 Consider the system x….= x3 .x.

a) Find all the equilibrium points and classify them.

b) Find a conserved quantity.

c) Sketch the phase portrait.

6.5.13 (Nonlinear centers)

a) Show that the Duffing equation x….+x+..x3 = 0 has a nonlinear center at the

origin for all .. .. 0.

b) If .. .. 0, show that all trajectories near the origin are closed. What about

trajectories that are far from the origin?

Show that each of the following systems is reversible, and sketch the phase portrait.

6.6.1 x􀀅 = y(1−x2 ), y􀀅 =1−y2

6.8.8 A smooth vector field on the phase plane is known to have exactly three

closed orbits. Two of the cycles, say C1 and C2, lie inside the third cycle C3.

However, C1 does not lie inside C2, nor vice-versa.

a) Sketch the arrangement of the three cycles.

b) Show that there must be at least one fixed point in the region bounded by C1, C2,

C3.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

You will need to consult 3 or 4 separate ONLINE sources (PLEASE INCLUDE ALL CITATIONS), [ONLINE SOURCES have citations]  Your references section for this assignment should include the bibliographic information for those sources [MAKE SURE TO CITE YOUR SOURCES!]. For this assignment you can use reference books, or any search engine. I am including TWO references below, but you will have to find the third or fourth on your own (you can call/visit your local library for example) [USE THE PUBLIC LIBRARY WITH YOUR LIBRARY CARD!].

  • ANY search engine (BUT you MUST include the source). 
  • Print reference books are available in the Oviatt Library’s Learning Commons (books on the first floor of the library) or
  • Reference e-books are available via the library’s website: http://library.calstate.edu/northridge/databases/subject/reference-resources (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Gale Virtual Reference Library, Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford Reference, or SAGE Knowledge)
  • AT THE LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY you may find the following source: Bright, William O. 2005.  “North American Indian Languages.” In The New Encyclopaedia Britannica, Macropaedia. vol. 22
  • Finally, remember you can use basic Google search, but be careful with this because the results are not always reliable so you will have to conduct a cross-reference check (especially when a source tells you that the information is UNKNOWN).
  1. U.S. State Names: How many out of 50 are in Indigenous languages? 

Find out which of the 50 states of the United States have names of American Indian origin—in other words, which ones (how many?) come originally from words in American Indigenous languages. Use a dictionary or encyclopedia from the reference collection (print or ebook).

The reference sources should identify etymologies (word origins) for place names (with source languages and words, usually with their meanings).

Tell what your source says about each state name in an Indigenous Language origin: Find the following information in your answer for FULL credit.

  • 1. What language is it derived from? 
  • 2. What is the original word from which the state name came?
  • 3. What did the original word mean?
  • 4. Add an interesting note that you learned about this word/name? There is a LOT you can say here, so I encourage you to include the most interesting observations in this box. 
  • 5. Classification, every language has a classification because every language belongs to a LANGUAGE FAMILY. For example, the Zapotec language belongs to the Otomanguean family of languages. Every Indigenous language belongs to a language family, so I am asking you to find the language family to which the STATE NAME IN AN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE BELONGS TO [please see the example below] This will be the most challenging part, and thus, YOU MUST INCLUDE the citation for the source where you found this information (see the example below).

(For some words, etymologies are controversial and often sources say UNKNOWN, but the information DOES exist, you just have to find it (thus, research).  Many of these items are reported quite inaccurately in dictionaries and particularly in unofficial ONLINE SOURCES, as we’ll see, but you should be accurate in quoting your source!  Note, too, that some names may have been borrowed first into another language (such as French or Spanish, BUT LOOK FOR THE NATIVE LANGUAGE ORIGIN) before being borrowed into English.  We are interested here in the original language source). You will find State Names that are NOT in an Indigenous language like CALIFORNIA, so you do not need to include this in your list because it is NOT an Indigenous Language.

Then, give the classification for the LANGUAGE FAMILY according to your Reference Sources for as many of these languages as you can.  SEE THE EXAMPLE BELOW (the example is from an encyclopedia). FACT: Every language belongs to a language family.

A good way to answer these questions could be to create a table with 6 columns, as below: 

State Name

< Language

Original Word or Phrase

Meaning

Notes

Classification

Alabama

Choctaw

Alba ayamule.

‘I make a clearing.’

Originally, two indigenous language words 1. alba and 2. ayamule, but it was turned into one “English” word!

Muskogean family, Macro-Algonkian stock source: (Bright 2005)

(Note: this assignment does not ask you to discover what NATIVE AMERICANS formerly lived in the various states, or to discover the origins of any state names which are not of INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE origin, or to discover which state names not of NATIVE LANGUAGE origin may have been used to refer to NATIVE groups.  For example, Delaware is the name of an INDIGENOUS society, but it is not an NATIVE AMERICAN word (as a GOOD reference source should confirm), so you should not include it in your list.  If you want to include additional etymologies for the state names not of INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE origin in your answer, please separate them in your answer from the etymologies that are relevant for this assignment.

INCLUDE A BIBLIOGRAPHY AND Cite the references you consulted using a standard bibliographic format, e.g.

Bright, William O. 2005.  “North American Indian Languages.” In The New Encyclopaedia Britannica, Macropaedia. vol. 22:762-767.

AlabamaAlaskaArizonaArkansasConnecticutHawaiiIdahoIllinoisIndianaIowaKansasKentuckyMassachusetMichiganMinnesotaMississippiMissouriNebraskaNew MexicoNorth and South DakotaOhioOklahomaTennesseeTexasUtahWisconsin

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

3) What role did science and expertise play in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era?

During the Progressive era many states allowed the sterilization of “unfit” individuals. It was during both the Gilded age and the Progressive era that international expositions took place and helped spread what is known as scientific racism to large groups. These fairs would project forms of white supremacy by showing the differences of “primitive villages” with modern science and technology. The study of eugenics was the method of “improving the human race.” This idea was so popular at the time that it appeared in published writings more than stories about poverty. This theory is interesting when learning about the Progressive Era and Gilded Age because

Two of the most noted popularizers of scientific racism were Madison Grant and Lothrop Stoddard, who both favored applying scientific knowledge to questions about immigration and race. Grant, a Nordic or Anglo-Saxon racialist who published the widely read The Passing of the Great Race in 1916, was primarily concerned about the “new immigrants” and thought the flood of recent immigrants from southern and eastern Europe was pushing the nation toward a racial abyss. Convinced that such a dire result was imminent, Grant argued that America’s preservation required it to exclude all inferior racial and ethnic groups. Stoddard, in contrast, focused his attention on black-white relations and his book The Rising Tide of Color against White World Supremacy (1920) was said to have inspired the leaders of the Ku Klux Klan.

The arguments advanced by the eugenicists were used to justify restriction, exclusion, and discrimination. Intellectuals promoted

The Progressive Era and Race 179

the idea that the human race could be neatly divided into hereditary types. Teutonic peoples topped the “civilized” list, and Medi- terranean, Oriental, and African peoples languished at the bottom. In response to the growing concern about the rising number of immigrants, immigration officials in 1907 added the character ization of “physical degeneracy” to the list of reasons that might be used to exclude new immigrants. The intention was to create a stringent medical test that would be administered by medical examiners at Ellis Island and used to exclude anyone deemed to be mentally or physically defective. The provision suggested just how strongly the theory of innate degeneracy had taken root in society. That same year Congress created the United States Immigration Commission (known as the Dillingham Commission) to study the immigration problem and recommend solutions. When the com- mission finally issued its report in 1911, it agreed that immigration from southern and eastern Europe did pose a threat to American society and culture, and called for the adoption of a restrictive literacy test to selectively limit the overall number. The Boston- based Immigration Restriction League quickly became the most effective of several lobbies for such a law. Both presidents William Howard Taft and Woodrow Wilson vetoed efforts to impose such a test on newcomers, but in the months before the United States entered World War I, Congress overrode Wilson’s veto and passed the Immigration Act of 1917. The new law prohibited entry into the country for any prospective immigrant who was 16 years or older and could not demonstrate the ability to read in any lan- guage. The measure served as a precursor to the quota-based leg- islation passed during the 1920s designed to severely restrict the number of southern and eastern Europeans and to exclude Asians entirely.

With the outbreak of war, there was a surge in antiforeign senti- ment against “hyphenated Americans.” At the urging of the Amer- ican Psychological Association, the U.S. Army began to administer intelligence tests to new recruits to identify potential officers, match recruits with appropriate jobs, and exclude the mentally deficient. The tests were heavily slanted in favor of native-born recruits from middle-class backgrounds who had attended high school. With such a built-in cultural bias, it is not surprising that new immigrants and southern blacks recorded the lowest scores. To defenders of the tests who regarded them as measures of innate intelligence, low scores could only serve as proof of inborn men- tal inferiority. To many Americans who read or heard about the

180 Daily Life in the Progressive Era

outcomes, the authority of experts and the U.S. government had been added to the arguments of intellectuals such as Grant and Stoddard to underscore the debasing influence of various ethnic and racial groups.

THE ERA OF “JIM CROW”

During the Progressive Era, the primary racial divide in the coun- try was white and black. Most Americans either acquiesced in the entrenchment of Jim Crowism or simply ignored the problem. As a result, segregation, disenfranchisement, economic and educational discrimination, peonage, race-baiting, lynching, and race rioting intensified for African Americans. One scholar has concluded that the Progressive Era, for all its liberal rhetoric and legislative accom- plishments, marked the “nadir” of African American life after emancipation. As historian David W. Southern has noted, however, the “history of African Americans always has two sides. One side relates what whites have thought about and done to blacks…The other side traces the aspirations and strivings of blacks to make a life for themselves in a hostile white world.”1

Disenfranchisement

The 1890s are historically significant for ushering in the era of Jim Crow (the term derived from the name of a poor, ragged minstrel character) when blacks were legally disenfranchised and segregated in the South. Although the black vote was reduced through intimidation and fear after ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment in 1870, white southerners sought to institutionalize the process during the 1890s. Beginning with Mississippi in 1890 and spreading to all 11 former Confederate states by 1911, white southerners amended their state constitutions to eliminate black voters without totally disenfranchising poor, illiterate white voters as well. They accomplished this by a series of legal contrivances that included property qualifications, residency requirements, lit- eracy tests, “good character” and “understanding” tests adminis- tered by white voter registrars, and the adoption of the all-white primary.

Another very effective method used to prevent hundreds of thousands of black men (and perhaps tens of thousands of white men as well) from casting their ballots was the poll tax. Poll taxes were personal taxes of from $1 to $2 per year, the payment of

The Progressive Era and Race 181

which was required for voting. Anyone wishing to vote was required to pay his poll tax long before the day of the election and to retain his receipt for several months to prove that he had paid his tax. In addition, the potential voter had to show that he had paid taxes for every year since turning 21. Perhaps the most ingenious method of disenfranchisement was the “grandfather clause,” which stated that only citizens whose grandfathers were registered to vote on January 1, 1867, could cast their ballots. Although such blatantly discriminatory devices as the grandfa- ther clause would be successfully challenged in court, a combina- tion of the other tactics effectively eliminated the black vote in the South. Louisiana was a typical example. Although 130,334 black voters were registered in 1896, after that state altered its consti- tution in 1898, the number of registered black voters dropped to 5,320 in 1900. By 1904 the number of registered black voters was fewer than 1,000.

4) Why did labor become a central issue in the Progressive Era? How did the United States government respond to labor activists?

Nonagricultural labor for blacks was equally harsh. Working as blue-collar laborers, fewer than 3 percent of blacks nationally held skilled jobs in 1910. And no matter how skilled a black worker might be, he always received wages that were lower than those of his white counterpart. With racial discrimination firmly entrenched, white employers offered the lower-paying and more arduous jobs to blacks. In 1910 blacks held 24,647 of the 28,674 jobs in the tur- pentine industry, regarded as the worst type of work available. Turpentine workers labored long hours in hot, humid weather at isolated worksites near insect-infested swamps. Poorly paid, they were forced to spend their hard-earned wages at company stores that charged exorbitant prices. Blacks made up 39.1 percent of the steelworkers in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1907, but they held the unskilled positions that paid the least and had the greatest risk of injury. Blacks comprised about one-half of the workers in the tobacco plants, but they were assigned the unskilled jobs that required haul- ing and stemming leaves by hand. In the textile industry, blacks were usually excluded from work in southern cotton mills because that work was reserved for poor white workers to prevent them from dropping below blacks on the ladder of economic status.

Black women faced even more limited job opportunities than did black men. Approximately 80 to 90 percent of black working

188 Daily Life in the Progressive Era

women toiled as cooks, maids, and laundresses. They commonly worked a six-day workweek of 10- to 14-hour days for $2 to $3 a week. Although only a small part of the population in northern cit- ies, black women comprised almost 30 percent of those who worked as servants by 1920. The dominant culture stigmatized married women who worked outside their homes during the Progressive Era, yet more than one-third of married black women in New York City were forced to do so in 1910; the comparable figure for mar- ried white women was only 4.2 percent. As an indication that racial discrimination in hiring had no sectional boundaries, more than 60 percent of black men and more than 80 percent of black women worked at menial jobs in northern cities.

5) Describe the situation of Black Americans during the Progressive Era. What strategies did Black leaders and activists adopt in response? Why?

Education

Another problem plaguing African Americans, especially those who lived in the South, was a substandard education. At the begin- ning of the twentieth century, southern states spent roughly twice as much per capita on white students as they did on black students. In states such as Mississippi and South Carolina, the ratio was 10 to 12 times as much. Even in more moderate southern states such as North Carolina, the black share of educational money declined

190 Daily Life in the Progressive Era

between 1900 and 1915. Black students often had only secondhand textbooks that applauded slavery and Jim Crow. Black students also had shorter school terms than did white students. Black urban schools were crowded, and class sizes were larger than those for whites. In many sections of the South, a dilapidated shanty might serve as a school. Black poet and essayist James Weldon Johnson remembered teaching 50 children in a crudely built church in rural Florida without a blackboard or desks. Public education for black children usually stopped at the sixth or seventh grade. Public high schools for blacks in the South were nonexistent. Regardless of the level of schooling, white school officials emphasized industrial train- ing for black students over a more liberal arts oriented curriculum.

Compounding problems for black education was the lack of qualified teachers and the low salaries paid to teachers. Only 20 percent of African American teachers had obtained more than a grammar school education. In 1915 the average monthly salary for elementary school teachers in Georgia was $60.25 for white men and $45.70 for white women. For black male and female elementary school teachers, the comparable figures were $30.14 and $21.69.

African American school in Anthoston, Kentucky, where the tobacco harvest has severely reduced the attendance, 1916. (Courtesy of the Library of Congress)

Some northern philanthropists provided money to black educa- tion. Julius Rosenwald, president of Sears, Roebuck and Company, donated liberally to build black schools, subsidizing the construc- tion of 100 black schools in Alabama alone in 1914. The Anna T. Jeans Fund, the Phelps-Stokes Foundation, and numerous north- ern religious denominations also contributed money to black edu- cation. The Rockefeller-backed General Education Board (GEB) spent $58 million between 1902 and 1909 on southern education. Ironically, 90 percent of GEB money went to white education. The reform-minded administrators of the GEB operated from the assumption that an educated southern white population would be less racist and more willing to accept the accommodationist ideas of black leaders such as Booker T. Washington. In the final analy- sis, the good news–bad news scenario for black education between 1900 and 1920 was that the overall illiteracy rate for southern blacks declined from two-thirds to less than one-half, and literacy rates were far higher for younger blacks. At the same time, however, educational inequality during the Progressive Era increased, and blacks fell even farther behind whites.

BLACK LEADERS

Thomas T. Fortune

Trying to address the many problems confronting African Ameri- cans in their daily lives were a series of exceptional black leaders. One of these was Thomas T. Fortune, editor of the New York Age, who established the National Afro-American League in 1890. In his opening address to nearly 100 delegates representing 23 states at the inaugural meeting of the organization in Chicago, Fortune looked to encourage black resistance to white oppression: “It is time to face the enemy,” he said, “and fight him inch by inch for every right he denies us…. Let this League be a race League.”9 Fortune hoped to spread state and local chapters of his militant league throughout the South, where they would be encouraged “in their efforts to break down color bars, and in obtaining for the Afro-American an equal chance with others in the avocations of life [and]…in securing the full privileges of citizenship.”10 He also advanced a number of strat- egies to improve black life that included self-help and the promo- tion of education. The Afro-American League supported civil rights and black voting, denounced segregation laws and the exclusion of blacks from public places, and condemned the convict lease system and lynching. Fortune favored peaceful methods to achieve his ends,

192 Daily Life in the Progressive Era

but he warned whites that if they continued to use violence, blacks would respond. “[I]f others use the weapons of violence to combat our peaceful arguments,” he said, “it is not for us to run away from violence. A man’s a man, and what is worth having is worth fight- ing for.”11 But for all its noble objectives, trying to establish a militant black organization in the South just as Jim Crow began to intensify was doomed to failure. The Afro-American League continued until the mid-1890s but was unable to make any progress.

Booker T. Washington

In 1895 another black leader, Booker T. Washington, delivered a famous speech at the Cotton States Exposition in Atlanta, Georgia, in which he laid out a different program for black advancement. Wash- ington was a former slave who had risen by hard work to become head of the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. Tuskegee stressed black self-reliance and self-discipline and emphasized the teaching of vocational skills that would enable blacks to become economically independent. From that perspective, Washington used his speech, known as the Atlanta Compromise, to prescribe his program for interracial cooperation in the South. He encouraged blacks to be willing to start at the bottom, learn industrial skills, commit them- selves to hard work, and focus on economic advancement. Seek- ing conciliation rather than confrontation, Washington also asked blacks to tacitly accept segregation and disenfranchisement and to defer demands for social and political equality. “In all things that are purely social,” he said, “we can be as separate as the fingers, yet one as the hand in all things essential to mutual progress.” It was best, he thought, not to make defiant demands. “The wisest among my race understand,” he stated, “that the agitation of questions of social equality is the extremest folly, and that progress in the enjoy- ment of all the privileges that will come to us must be the result of severe and constant struggle rather than of artificial forcing.”12 If southern whites would recognize the economic potential of trust- ing blacks and would enable black opportunity (provide jobs), they would be repaid for their efforts with greater economic prosper- ity and racial harmony. Over time, African American advancement in education (vocationally emphasized) and their contributions to southern economic growth would win white support for broadened civil rights. Washington’s program, seen in the context of worsen- ing race relations, had appeal. The speech was warmly received by both white and black audiences and by those who read it when

Booker T. Washington, head of the Tuskegee Institute and proponent of interracial cooperation. (Courtesy of the Library of Congress)

it was widely reprinted in the press. Washington seemed to offer practical solutions to the problems of everyday life.

W. E. B. Du Bois

In 1903 William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, the most prominent black intellectual of his era, published The Souls of Black Folk, in which he challenged the accommodationist ideology of Washington. In his mind Washington conceded too much, practically accepting “the alleged inferiority of the Negro races,” and withdrew “many of the high demands of Negroes as men and American citizens.” Blacks, argued Du Bois, needed their constitutional rights, includ- ing the right to vote and to have access to higher education for tal- ented members of the race. In his criticism, Du Bois raised a most important question: “Is it possible, and probable, that nine mil- lions of men can make effective progress in economic lines if they are deprived of political rights, made a servile caste, and allowed only the most meagre [sic] chance for developing their exceptional men? If history and reason give any distinct answer to these ques- tions, it is an emphatic No.”13 Du Bois believed that Washington’s economic-centered program would result in the creation of a cheap, submissive supply of labor for an industrializing South and result in further exploitation rather than economic progress for blacks. He further believed that racial advancement for blacks was the responsibility of the black elite, who he called the Talented Tenth. “Work alone,” he argued, “will not do it unless inspired by the right ide- als and guided by intelligence. Education must not simply teach work—it must teach Life. The Talented Tenth of the Negro race must be made leaders of thought and missionaries of culture among people.”14 They would gain the respect of white society, serve as role models for other blacks, and raise the race.

To give organizational stature to his ideas, Du Bois issued a call for black leaders to organize a campaign for black equality. Fifty- nine men signed the call, and 29 of them ultimately convened in Niagara, Canada, (a major terminus on the Underground Rail- road) on July 11, 1905, to rekindle a militant abolitionist movement and demand full citizenship for black Americans. What grew out of that meeting (held on the Canadian side of the border because

no American hotel would grant them accommodations) was the Niagara Movement. In a tone that reminded one of Fortune’s mili- tant stance 15 years before, the declaration of principles adopted by the delegates included calls for restoring to blacks the right to vote, ending segregation, and enacting complete equality in economic opportunity and education. At the second annual meeting of the organization held at Harper’s Ferry (the site of John Brown’s mar- tyrdom), Du Bois expanded his demands to include social equality. In his address to the country, given on the final day of the confer- ence, Du Bois reinforced his commitment to an ideal. “We claim for ourselves,” he stated, “every single right that belongs to a freeborn American, political, civil and social; and until we get those rights we will never cease to protest and to assail the ears of America.”15 Although the Niagara Movement continued to meet for two more years and eventually grew to 400 members, internal disagree- ments, insufficient funding, the lack of an official publication for publicity, and attacks from those who supported Washington pre- vented it from becoming an effective civil rights organization.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University Of California Los

Please answer *one* of the following four questions (in roughly 600-900 words):

1. Advertisers for decades have exerted significant control over mass media in the United States — a topic covered at length in the course material. What kind of efforts have been made to push back against or limit the influence of advertisers? Which of those efforts have been most effective in your opinion and how might those efforts apply to today’s networked digital era, where search engine and social media corporations wield enormous power to deliver audiences? Please make explicit reference to course readings in your answer.

2. In the United States, the mass media has tended to amplify the voices of certain kinds of people. What kinds of people? Please provide examples from different chapters of US history that demonstrate whose voices were being amplified. How would you say that kind of amplification has shaped American perceptions of reality? Whose voices weren’t being amplified by the mainstream media and, as a result, what kind of things were mainstream-media audiences not properly learning about? In writing your answer, please draw explicitly on material you read that was included on the course syllabus and/or that you explored in the course discussion forums.

3. What do you think has exerted a greater influence on mass media content over the course of U.S. history: media business models or media technologies? Explain why you chose one over the other and please draw explicitly on course readings to support your answer. (*Note: A “business model” is how a media outlet makes money — through donors, advertisers, sponsors, subscribers, taxpayers, etc.)

4. In this course, you have studied the history of mass-media journalism in the United States. Many observers believe that developments in the digital era have thrown U.S. journalism into crisis. Others, like Barnouw, for instance, might say that the business model embraced by journalism is the main problem and has been the problem for a very long time — that commercial journalism in the United States has always been in crisis. What is the nature of the crisis these people are describing? In what way is it the same crisis now as it was in earlier periods? Use examples from the past eras we have studied to make your case. *Bonus: What do you suggest might be done to finally move U.S. journalism out of this crisis?

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

introduction to the “Three Ps” (Pathophysiology, Pharmacology, and Physical Assessment) and the clinical course expectations.

If the link above does not work, copy and paste this URL into your browser: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1tL9Q95uf8FxhqS3vOTxCMz5lrMx6a7YG601VU61kqG8/edit?usp=sharing

This assignment has two parts; reflections and goals. The goals section has two subparts: 3P goals and clinical goals. They do not need to be in APA format, but please choose a format that is organized and visually pleasing. You are not limited to a word document; PDF are acceptable..

  • Reflection: 150-250 words
    • Reflect upon what was learned and briefly write about your thoughts. Include:
      • If no material was new to you, what do you wish was covered instead? How to find preceptors and how the school is planning on helping students.
      • what are your greatest concerns or greater perceived challenges for the second half of the FNP program? Challenges, work-life school situation
  • Goals: (Separate from the above 250 word count)
    • provide three specific goals to help guide your success in two areas
    • Goals for the 3P courses: (three goals, bullet points are acceptable)
    • Goals for clinical experiences: (three goals, bullet points are acceptable)
  • When writing your goals, try to keep in mind principles of SMART goals (specific, measurable, attainable, relevant/realistic, and time-oriented)

Some Examples: (but remember you need 3 of each goal type)

1) My first 3P goal is to study pathophysiology for 6 hours every week by setting aside 60 min every night from 8-8:30 for six nights a week.

2) My first clinical goal is to contact 7 different clinics each week to look for a pediatric preceptor until I have found someone.

3) My second clinical goal is to decrease my work to part-time so that I can do 40 extra hours in my pediatric rotation in October-December 2022 so that I can be more marketable in a pediatric practice after graduation.

My goal will be the same as above, make more time to study, and look for a preceptors for peds, OB, and primary care.


Expectations

  • Length: 150-250 words for the reflection, and provide at least three SMART goals for the 3P courses and three goals for the clinical courses
  • Format: No APA required, however, please follow professional grammar and spelling conventions. Extra points are given to original, unique styles that are organized, professional, and visually pleasing.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

1. Evaluate the introduction. What do you expect from the rest of the essay? What kind of context/background has the author provided for the reader? Does it seem like enough context? Has the author primarily listed a series of general claims that will need to be developed (created an outline of the essay), or has the author simply shown the problem by presenting an anecdote or an example that leads to a single claim/thesis statement? Has the author done something else entirely? Does it seem like enough set up for the rest of the essay? Too little? Too much? What has the introduction committed the author to do – to develop — in the rest of the essay? Ultimately, does the introduction give the reader a clear sense of the main issue/problem? If the introduction contains a thesis statement, evaluate it.

80 word minimum

2.Evaluate the first body paragraph. What is its main purpose? Does it have a single purpose (good), or does it seemingly have more than one purpose vying for control (not so good)? How well does it achieve the main purpose? Is the paragraph built around a single controlling claim, or is it essentially built around an example? What is the paragraph made of? Is it essentially one claim + one example? A summary of a source? A main claim + reason(s) + evidence? What types of evidence are used? Are there any claims that would benefit from some SHOWing, from a concrete example or detail? Are there any claims that would benefit from the addition of a number or statistic? Do you have alternative or additional ideas for developing the paragraph? Any small items in need of improvement – the grammar and mechanics and style and tone – that you can mention? Anything other advice or comments to offer?

3. Evaluate the second body paragraph. What is its main purpose? Does it have a single purpose (good), or does it seemingly have more than one purpose vying for control (not so good)? How well does it achieve the main purpose? Is the paragraph built around a single controlling claim, or is it essentially built around an example? What is the paragraph made of? Is it essentially one claim + one example? A summary of a source? A main claim + reason(s) + evidence? What types of evidence are used? Are there any claims that would benefit from some SHOWing, from a concrete example or detail? Are there any claims that would benefit from the addition of a number or statistic? Do you have alternative or additional ideas for developing the paragraph? Any small items in need of improvement – the grammar and mechanics and style and tone – that you can mention? Anything other advice or comments to offer?

4. Evaluate the third body paragraph. What is its main purpose? Does it have a single purpose (good), or does it seemingly have more than one purpose vying for control (not so good)? How well does it achieve the main purpose? Is the paragraph built around a single controlling claim, or is it essentially built around an example? What is the paragraph made of? Is it essentially one claim + one example? A summary of a source? A main claim + reason(s) + evidence? What types of evidence are used? Are there any claims that would benefit from some SHOWing, from a concrete example or detail? Are there any claims that would benefit from the addition of a number or statistic? Do you have alternative or additional ideas for developing the paragraph? Any small items in need of improvement – the grammar and mechanics and style and tone – that you can mention? Anything other advice or comments to offer?

5. Evaluate the fourth body paragraph. What is its main purpose? Does it have a single purpose (good), or does it seemingly have more than one purpose vying for control (not so good)? How well does it achieve the main purpose? Is the paragraph built around a single controlling claim, or is it essentially built around an example? What is the paragraph made of? Is it essentially one claim + one example? A summary of a source? A main claim + reason(s) + evidence? What types of evidence are used? Are there any claims that would benefit from some SHOWing, from a concrete example or detail? Are there any claims that would benefit from the addition of a number or statistic? Do you have alternative or additional ideas for developing the paragraph? Any small items in need of improvement – the grammar and mechanics and style and tone – that you can mention? Anything other advice or comments to offer?

6. 80 word minimum

Evaluate the conclusion. Does it merely restate the major claims from the body of the essay, or does it offer something more? In other words, is it a summary or a conclusion? Does it close the essay with a larger significance and relevance (relative to the smaller significance of individual body paragraphs)? Does it revisit a story or detail or phrasing from the introduction to give the reader the impression of coming full circle and therefore reaching the natural end of the paper? Is the conclusion effective? Why or why not? Do you have any alternative ideas for concluding the essay? Any additions to recommend to the author? Anything other advice or comments to offer regarding this paragraph? (70 words minimum)

7. What is the main issue the author will be developing in the essay? The thesis statement or your succinct version of the issue both work as a response to this question. What is the first thing the author gives you to make you believe them? Brief (one sentence) description of the main point or purpose of the second paragraph. Combine what the author DOES and SAYS in this paragraph. What is the second thing the author gives you to make you believe them? What is the third thing the author gives you to make you believe them? What is the fourth thing the author gives you to make you believe them? What larger significance does the author connect to the main issue in the conclusion? What does your five or six sentence portrayal of the essay reveal?(60 words minimum)

8. Evaluate the author’s use of outside sources. Are the sources blended into the essay smoothly and skillfully? Does the author integrate the sources in a variety of ways, or does the author rely on a repetitive, robotic integration approach? Are the sources used for various purposes – providing a claim, contributing a reason, offering a piece of evidence – or does each source serve the same purpose? Does the author make use of paraphrase (good), or does the author rely solely on direct quotes? Could or should any of the quotes be converted to a paraphrase? Anything other advice or comments to offer regarding sources?(40words minimum)

9. Does the author make any connections between the main issue/subject and unrelated (until the author made the connection) subjects such as historical or current events, philosophy, psychology, sociology, literature, scientific theories, famous quotes, and so on? If so, how well does the connection “work”?

(25 words minimum)

10. Any other constructive comments to add? Any improvements to suggest regarding grammar and mechanics and style and tone? You could, and probably should, offer some comments with the “Essay Grading Rubric – General” handout in mind (find it in the “Handouts” folder on Blackboard). The Know Your Audience handout might also be instructive and help you offer useful constructive criticism.

11. Evaluate the introduction. What do you expect from the rest of the essay? What kind of context/background has the author provided for the reader? Does it seem like enough context? Has the author primarily listed a series of general claims that will need to be developed (created an outline of the essay), or has the author simply shown the problem by presenting an anecdote or an example that leads to a single claim/thesis statement? Has the author done something else entirely? Does it seem like enough set up for the rest of the essay? Too little? Too much? What has the introduction committed the author to do – to develop — in the rest of the essay? Ultimately, does the introduction give the reader a clear sense of the main issue/problem? If the introduction contains a thesis statement, evaluate it. (80 words minimum)

12. 80 word minimum

Evaluate the first body paragraph. What is its main purpose? Does it have a single purpose (good), or does it seemingly have more than one purpose vying for control (not so good)? How well does it achieve the main purpose? Is the paragraph built around a single controlling claim, or is it essentially built around an example? What is the paragraph made of? Is it essentially one claim + one example? A summary of a source? A main claim + reason(s) + evidence? What types of evidence are used? Are there any claims that would benefit from some SHOWing, from a concrete example or detail? Are there any claims that would benefit from the addition of a number or statistic? Do you have alternative or additional ideas for developing the paragraph? Any small items in need of improvement – the grammar and mechanics and style and tone – that you can mention? Anything other advice or comments to offer?

13. Evaluate the second body paragraph. What is its main purpose? Does it have a single purpose (good), or does it seemingly have more than one purpose vying for control (not so good)? How well does it achieve the main purpose? Is the paragraph built around a single controlling claim, or is it essentially built around an example? What is the paragraph made of? Is it essentially one claim + one example? A summary of a source? A main claim + reason(s) + evidence? What types of evidence are used? Are there any claims that would benefit from some SHOWing, from a concrete example or detail? Are there any claims that would benefit from the addition of a number or statistic? Do you have alternative or additional ideas for developing the paragraph? Any small items in need of improvement – the grammar and mechanics and style and tone – that you can mention? Anything other advice or comments to offer?

14. Evaluate the third body paragraph. What is its main purpose? Does it have a single purpose (good), or does it seemingly have more than one purpose vying for control (not so good)? How well does it achieve the main purpose? Is the paragraph built around a single controlling claim, or is it essentially built around an example? What is the paragraph made of? Is it essentially one claim + one example? A summary of a source? A main claim + reason(s) + evidence? What types of evidence are used? Are there any claims that would benefit from some SHOWing, from a concrete example or detail? Are there any claims that would benefit from the addition of a number or statistic? Do you have alternative or additional ideas for developing the paragraph? Any small items in need of improvement – the grammar and mechanics and style and tone – that you can mention? Anything other advice or comments to offer?

15. Evaluate the fourth body paragraph. What is its main purpose? Does it have a single purpose (good), or does it seemingly have more than one purpose vying for control (not so good)? How well does it achieve the main purpose? Is the paragraph built around a single controlling claim, or is it essentially built around an example? What is the paragraph made of? Is it essentially one claim + one example? A summary of a source? A main claim + reason(s) + evidence? What types of evidence are used? Are there any claims that would benefit from some SHOWing, from a concrete example or detail? Are there any claims that would benefit from the addition of a number or statistic? Do you have alternative or additional ideas for developing the paragraph? Any small items in need of improvement – the grammar and mechanics and style and tone – that you can mention? Anything other advice or comments to offer?

16. Evaluate the conclusion. Does it merely restate the major claims from the body of the essay, or does it offer something more? In other words, is it a summary or a conclusion? Does it close the essay with a larger significance and relevance (relative to the smaller significance of individual body paragraphs)? Does it revisit a story or detail or phrasing from the introduction to give the reader the impression of coming full circle and therefore reaching the natural end of the paper? Is the conclusion effective? Why or why not? Do you have any alternative ideas for concluding the essay? Any additions to recommend to the author? Anything other advice or comments to offer regarding this paragraph?

17. What is the main issue the author will be developing in the essay? The thesis statement or your succinct version of the issue both work as a response to this question. What is the first thing the author gives you to make you believe them? Brief (one sentence) description of the main point or purpose of the second paragraph. Combine what the author DOES and SAYS in this paragraph. What is the second thing the author gives you to make you believe them? What is the third thing the author gives you to make you believe them? What is the fourth thing the author gives you to make you believe them? What larger significance does the author connect to the main issue in the conclusion? What does your five or six sentence portrayal of the essay reveal?

18. 60 word minimum

Evaluate the author’s use of outside sources. Are the sources blended into the essay smoothly and skillfully? Does the author integrate the sources in a variety of ways, or does the author rely on a repetitive, robotic integration approach? Are the sources used for various purposes – providing a claim, contributing a reason, offering a piece of evidence – or does each source serve the same purpose? Does the author make use of paraphrase (good), or does the author rely solely on direct quotes? Could or should any of the quotes be converted to a paraphrase? Anything other advice or comments to offer regarding sources?

19. Does the author make any connections between the main issue/subject and unrelated (until the author made the connection) subjects such as historical or current events, philosophy, psychology, sociology, literature, scientific theories, famous quotes, and so on? If so, how well does the connection “work”?

20. Any other constructive comments to add? Any improvements to suggest regarding grammar and mechanics and style and tone? You could, and probably should, offer some comments with the “Essay Grading Rubric – General” handout in mind (find it in the “Handouts” folder on Blackboard). The Know Your Audience handout might also be instructive and help you offer useful constructive criticism.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Directions

The second and final paper in the assignment picks up where the first paper stops.

In the second paper you will be making connections with the new theory covered in Sessions 5-8 and you will making practical suggestions for building and maintaining a collaborative system. Since the second paper picks up where the first paper stops, you need the instructions from the first paper. You are still acting as an advisor for a generic public organization that has become overly insular and siloed. In the first paper you used material through Session 4. This material tended to be more theoretical in order to lay a good foundation for action. Sessions 5-8 material, though still containing theory that needs to be addressed, is much more practical in the sense that it provides contemporary ways to use theory in tangible actions. So, what you need to do is continue on as the advisor to the organization and use material from Sessions 5-8 to more fully describe actions you recommend them taking. This by necessity would be prescriptive. It could also be normative as you could have actions based in organizational values.

Cited use of course material is also expected in this paper. The two papers together will comprise the justification and recommendations for change presented to the organization you serve as a consultant.

Assignment Details

  • Length: 5 pages (exclusive of title and reference page)
  • APA style for all citations
  • Word, 12 point, double-spaced
  • The professor uses the rubric as a guide for examining papers. The rubric helps students with the addressing content within the paper. The professor may deviate from the rubric if desired, but these are each important areas for students to address within the paper.

Rubric for Written Assignments

A (90-100) The essay is exceptional in every way. The essay is well organized and all claims are supported. It begins with a solid introduction, is followed by body paragraphs that contain clear topic sentences with clear and detailed support, and ends with an effective conclusion. Content is thorough and lacking in no area. There are no (or few) errors in tone, format, mechanics, grammar, and content. APA citation and writing conventions are followed virtually error free.

B (80-89) The essay is above adequate in most areas. In the areas where it is not above adequate, it is still entirely acceptable. The majority of the essay is clear, focused, and well detailed, but there may be a few areas requiring further development. While it may contain a few errors with tone, mechanics, grammar, and/or content, these errors are not egregious enough to detract from the overall point presented. APA citation and writing conventions are largely followed with some errors present.

C (70-79) The essay is adequate in most areas but exceptional in none. The writing is clear although lacking in both control and command. Organization may be problematic but can be fixed. The paragraphs provide support but are generally underdeveloped. There may be multiple errors in tone, format, mechanics, grammar, and content, but these errors do not, for the most part, detract from the overall writing. APA citation and writing conventions are not consistently followed.

F (0-69) The essay is lacking in a majority of areas. It is generally unorganized and unfocused. The writing is not clear in a significant portion of the essay. Most of the essay is underdeveloped. There are frequent errors in tone, format, mechanics, grammar, and/or content that distract from the content being provided and understood. There are significant problems throughout the written product. APA citation and writing conventions contain significant errors or is not followed. The failing paper can have a wide range of gradations on the issues mentioned above.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

I’m working on a communications discussion question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.

1) Write an introduction to your talk, keeping in mind the specific location that you are starting at on your site. The five w’s are important to keep in mind when introducing your talk to your audience: who, what, where, when, and why? Let the audience know what your talk is about, why you are meeting at that location, who the most relevant characters are (human or other animals), and anything they need to know about time (of year, in history, etc.). Provide the basic information that we need to know in order to get started and follow your talk. A good introduction is usually somewhere between 2-5 minutes. How many words or pages is that? Read it aloud and time your delivery in order to find out.

2) As part of your introduction, hook the audience. The hook can be whatever grabs the audience’s attention and gets the “hooked” into following your tour and wanting to take part as active listeners. Producing a good hook is an art, not a science. For example, your hook might be a really good question, one that will at least be partially answered by your talk. We listen to stories because we want to know how a central tension or question will be resolved. Ideally, the audience is actively engaged in answering the question as well. That is how you get “buy in” from your audience. Get them interested and involved. However, while all good talks have a central question to be resolved, that is not always accomplished with the hook. That is why the final project rubric has two categories, one for “hook” and one for “question asked and answered.” Those two things might be one and the same, overlap with each other, or completely separate in your talk. 

3) Outline your talk as a whole, including a sentence or two for each stop and the conclusion. Briefly describe what you plan to discuss and/or ask the audience to do at each stop. Cite quotes or pieces of information that you will be using from your journalistic and scholarly resources, with attention to what will genuinely propel your presentation. This is not just about listing information, it is about entertaining and educating your audience through a purposeful narrative, one that has the added advantage of using the landscape to tell the story. In sum, think about the basics of good storytelling: setting, plot (what information goes where?), and characters (key site features, people, and or other animals, that are at the center of your talk).

4) This week’s reading is about “risk communication.” Many of the key terms and concepts in the chapter are fairly dramatic and laden with emotion. In a way, communicating risk is a matter of storytelling using the best available evidence. They are matters of life and death for individuals as well as whole societies. For example, what is the “precautionary principle” if not the story of what could potentially happen to us if we do not take action (and/or cease certain actions and trends). In 100-200 words, explain how one of the concepts in the textbook could relate to your interpretive field project. Make sure you define the concept before explaining how it relates to your site and/or topic.

5) Shelton Johnson is a master interpreter for the National Park Service. What does he do well in this video performance that you would like to do in your talk? It helps to experience many effective interpreters. That is why we have assigned and provided several examples during the course, including past student tours on Izy.Travel as well as expert examples like Mr. Johnson’s performance. Draw inspiration and ideas from them, and then start to produce your best talk. Also, remember that every format is different. Keep in mind the requirements and affordances of the Izy.Travel format and the interpretive talk assignment when crafting your tour. Invest your interest and passion so that your audience will also care about your important site and topic.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

7.5-1. Let Y1 < Y2 < Y3 < Y4 < Y5 < Y6 be the order statistics of a random sample of size n = 6 from a distri-bution of the continuous type having (100p)th percentile πp. Compute

(a) P(Y2 <π0.5 < Y5). (b) P(Y1 <π0.25 < Y4). (c) P(Y4 <π0.9 < Y6).

7.5-4. Let m denote the median weight of “80-pound” bags of water softener pellets. Use the following random sample of n = 14 weights to find an approximate 95% confidence interval for m:

80.51 80.28 80.40 80.35 80.38 80.28 80.27 80.16 80.59 80.56 80.32 80.27 80.53 80.32

(a) Find a 94.26% confidence interval for m.

(b) The interval (y6, y12) could serve as a confidence inter-val for π0.6. What is its confidence coefficient?

7.5-5. A biologist who studies spiders selected a random sample of 20 male green lynx spiders (a spider that does not weave a web, but chases and leaps on its prey) and measured the lengths (in millimeters) of one of the front legs of the 20 spiders. Use the following measurements toconstruct a confidence interval for m that has a confidence coefficient about equal to 0.95:

15.10 16.40 13.55 15.75

13.60 16.45 14.05 17.05 15.25

17.75 15.40 16.80

20.00 15.45 16.95 19.05 16.65 16.25 17.55 19.05

7.5-12. Let Y1 < Y2 < ··· < Y8 be the order statistics of eight independent observations from a continuous-type distribution with 70th percentile π0.7 = 27.3.(a) Determine P(Y7 < 27.3). (b) Find P(Y5 < 27.3 < Y8).

8.1-2. Assume that the weight of cereal in a “12.6-ounce box” is N(μ, 0.22). The Food and Drug Association (FDA) allows only a small percentage of boxes to contain less than 12.6 ounces. We shall test the null hypothesis H0: μ = 13 against the alternative hypothesis H1: μ< 13. (a) Use a random sample of n = 25 to define the test statistic and the critical region that has a significance level of α = 0.025.

(b) If x = 12.9, what is your conclusion? (c) What is the p-value of this test?

8.1-3. Let X equal the Brinell hardness measurement of ductile iron subcritically annealed. Assume that the distri-bution of X is N(μ, 100). We shall test the null hypothesis H0: μ = 170 against the alternative hypothesis H1: μ> 170, using n = 25 observations of X.

(a) Define the test statistic and a critical region that has a significance level of α = 0.05. Sketch a figure showing this critical region.

(b) A random sample of n = 25 observations ofX yielded the following measurements:

170 167 174 179 179 156 163 156 187 156 183 179 174 179 170 156 187 179 183 174 187 167 159 170 179

Calculate the value of the test statistic and state your conclusion clearly.

(c) Give the approximate p-value of this test.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

1. Let A ⊆ R. We say that an element c ∈ A is isolated if there is an ε > 0 such that
A ∩ (c − ε, c + ε) = {c}.
(a) Show that c ∈ A is an isolated point if and only if it is not a limit point of A.
(b) Show that every function f : A → R is continuous at each isolated c ∈ A.
(c) Show that every function f : Z → R is continuous on its domain Z.

2. For each of the following functions f : A → R, find f(A) and hence decide whether f
(equivalently its range) has an upper bound, a lower bound, a maximum or a minimum.
(a) f(x) = x
3
, A = (−3, 2).
(b) f(x) = x
2
, A = (−3, 2)
(c) f(x) = (
x if x ∈ Q
0 if x /∈ Q
, A = [0, a] where a > 0.

3. Assume f : R → R is continuous on R and let K = {x : f(x) = 0}. Show that K is a
closed set.

4. Give an example of each of the following, or state that such a request is impossible. For
any that are impossible, supply a short explanation for why this is the case.
(a) A continuous function f : (0, 1) → R and a Cauchy sequence (xn) in (0, 1) such
that (f(xn)) is not a Cauchy sequence.
(b) A continuous function f : [0, 1] → R and a Cauchy sequence (xn) in [0, 1] such that
(f(xn)) is not a Cauchy sequence.
(c) A continuous function f : [0, 1] → R which has a maximum but no minimum.
(d) A continuous bounded function f : (0, 1) → R that attains a maximum value but
not a minimum value.

5. (a) Let f be a continuous real-valued function with domain (a, b). Show that if f(x) = 0
for each rational number x in (a, b), then f(x) = 0 for all x ∈ (a, b).
(b) If f and g are continuous real-valued functions with domain (a, b) and f(x) = g(x)
for all rational x ∈ (a, b), must f and g be the same function?

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

This should be like a journal you keep for your character you are creating, do not write as if you’re trying to say what you think I want you to say, this is your own personal creation. Again, it should be like YOUR CHARACTER’S DIARY! Take risks, go to the dark and dirty places your character goes, remember there is nothing politically correct about the personal choices characters make – be completely flushed out and real. You are playing the part, no one else will have your monologue. Take RISKS and Go THERE! Just memorizing your lines does not mean you are acting, you have to fill it with real-life choices. Be specific and HAVE FUN! Must write a paragraph minimum for EACH question!

ATTACHED IS THE SCRIPT WHERE YOU WILL FIND CHARACTERS


Your main character is tony however you must write about savage as well


  1. Relationship
  • Creating a relationship is the heart of acting
  • What is your relationship with the other character in the scene?
  • Facts are never enough, they help you begin – help you create the relationship
  • Once you have the fact, you are ready to explore how you feel about the other character; either the one spoken to or spoken about
  • Ask questions about your emotional attitude towards this person – Do you love him, hate him, resent him, how much, do you want to help him, what do you want from him, ect…?
  • The fact of a relationship has no value to the actor unless it leads him/her to explore the feeling in the relationship NOW – the now is the imperative question you must ask
  • You must commit 1000%
  1. Conflict, What are you fighting for?
  • Without conflict, there is no scene
  • What do you WANT in this scene?
  • Instead of using goals or motivations, use what are you fighting for?
  • It will keep you active and at the moment, without causing you to give up
  • Always have a positive want(motivation) – it’s more forceful, stronger, and will serve you in a more emotional way than a negative choice
  • It makes the stakes higher
  • How, then, do you achieve balance if everyone is there pitching hard for what they’re fighting for? Through relationship. Through the give and take and consideration of other characters, through your sensitivity to their reactions towards what you’re fighting for- through increased awareness of others and how you affect them and how they affect you; a heightening of the awareness you have in life toward other people
  • Maximum conflict is what you should be looking for. Who is interfering with your getting what you are fighting for? Do battle with her, fight her, woo her, charm her, revile her. Find as many ways as you can to go about getting what you are fighting for.
  • The more ways you find – them more interesting your performance will be
  • The actor must find out what the basic fight is in every character in every scene
  1. The Moment Before
  • Every scene you will ever act begins in the middle, and it is up to you, the actor, to provide what comes before.
  • This is true if you do a scene at the beginning of a play, middle, or end. Something always precedes what you are doing – the moment before
  • Be prepared in auditions, do your homework prior – it usually takes actors most of the reading to get warmed up. By the time they are, they’ve lost the attention of the auditors
  • Never does an actor need the moment before more desperately than in the audition situation
  • In order to create the moment before the actor will have to go back 10-20 years in the life of the character
  • Actors tend to generalize. Be specific! The more specific, focused you are the moment before, the better the entire scene will go
  • It requires important emotional commitment – you have to go there. Not just in your mind – you got to walk on ready to fight for what you want (substitution, etc…)
  • The first impression is the strongest impression left on the auditors. When an actor comes on stage in a performance, the first impression he makes is a lasting one on the audience. It had better be an impressive one
  • The moment before must be strong, meaty, and full; it’s got to give the actor something to feed on throughout the scene
  1. Humor
  • Humor is not a joke
  • It is the attitude toward being alive without which long ago you would have jumped off the empire state bldg.
  • Humor is not being funny
  • It is the exchange between people that makes it possible for us to get through our day
  • Humor exists even in the humorless. It is in every scene, just as in every situation in life.
  • Actors tend to take the humor out of scenes to make it dramatic – but that is the core reason that makes acting un-lifelike
  • Actors will say “how can I find humor in this scene? It’s very serious!” For the exact same reason, one would be driven to find humor in the same situation in life: because it is deadly serious and human beings cannot bear all that heavyweight, they alleviate the burden by humor
  • The heavier the situation the more humor we need
  • A lot of actors do this instinctively – but if it’s not there then the actor must make a conscious effort a find it (scripted or unscripted)
  • Humorless acting is the deadliest kind: its the hallmark of soap opera performing
  • You’ll find it in all the stars you admire
  1. Opposites
  • Whatever you decide is your motivation in a scene, the opposite of that is also true and should be in it
  • Like in life, we live with opposites – sometimes you hate the person you love ( a parent and a child). If there is a great need for someone there’s also resentment towards them because of your need for them.
  • It is the actor’s creation of opposites that develops conflict, and therefore drama, and therefore interest
  • For some reason, actors are fond of bringing on stage the resolution of a conflict, which is tidy and dead, rather than the conflict itself, which is exciting
  • This has to do with us being trained in life to avoid conflict, run from confrontations, make our painful lives as easy as we can for ourselves. But it is the process of dealing with pain the actor must put on the stage, not the fact of having solved it.
  • The more extreme the opposite the actor chooses for a scene, the more everything in between is likely to occur instinctively, naturally, without the actor having to consider the choices.
  • There are opposites in every scene. The actor will have to dig. The playwright may well have implied them under the surface of the character and not have written them into the dialogue at all ( subtext)
  1. Discoveries
  • Every scene is filled with discoveries, things that happen for the first time. No matter how many times it has happened in the past, there is something new about this experience, this moment.
  • It makes it active – we the audience will experience it with you
  • The discoveries may be about the other character, or about oneself, or someone offstage, or about the situation now or the situation as it existed ten years ago and how the effects the now
  • The more discoveries you make in a scene- the less you rely on “we do this every day” – the more interesting the scene will be
  • It’s hard to bring vitality and life to routine, but they are difficult to escape when you have the excitement of discoveries
  • Take nothing for granted; make an emotional discovery as often as you can find one in a scene – ask yourself what is knew
  • Actors need to work from real-life situations, not literary or character concepts. Most often the discoveries aren’t written on the surface of the script, the actor will have to dig into the subtext to find them. They come out of the actor’s own life questions
  1. Communication and Competition
  • Communication
  • Acting is communicating
  • It is not enough for the actor to feel if that feeling is not being communicated
  • It takes two to communicate. The sender and the receiver. The receiver has to acknowledge the message by sending a reply back to the sender, thus completing the circle before communication has taken place. It’s a cycle
  • You can not go forward without the cycle being completed – cause then you’re just talking and neither of you is in the moment
  • LISTEN to one another – what was just said, how did that make you feel, what are you going to do about it? It is much more than just exchanging words.
  • Receiving the feelings of another is even harder than sending out feelings of your own. It requires sensitivity, a heightened awareness of another person, investment of real caring; otherwise, why will you undertake the formidable task of opening yourself up to true communication?
  • Granted in life we’re not always talking to people but at them, and rarely do we listen- we just want to get our point across.
  • Feel the need to listen for selfish reasons
  • Communication is the desire to change the person to whom you communicating
  • Competition
  • All dramatic relationships are competitive; there’s a lot of resistance.
  • There are two points of view with which an actor should execute each scene (a) I am right and you are wrong (b) You should change from being the way you are to the way I think you should be
  • No games are any fun unless the participants are competing
  • We compete for everything: to tell the funniest story, to be considered the most truthful or sincere, the prettiest, the sexiest, the most reliable. We compete for enough food, for jobs, for love, affection, friends, and lovers. There isn’t anything for which we don’t compete.
  • Competition is healthy, it’s life
  • A good actor is the one who competes, willingly, and enjoys the competition
  1. Importance
  • Plays are written about the most important moments in people’s lives, not about their everyday humdrumness. If that was the case who would leave home to go and pay they ridiculous prices to watch a play
  • Raise the stakes: make it a Life or Death situation
  • The truth is not enough, if it is neither dramatic, interesting nor unique – it must be invested with sufficient emotion to make it important
  • It is important for an actor to realize that what he/she must use in their acting is the opposite of what he/she has been trained in life to seek. Peacefulness and the avoidance of trouble won’t help them in their acting. It is just the opposite they must seek
  • Important does not necessarily mean significant to others. It means emotionally important to you at this moment. We make trivial things important to us in the moment, even if we forget them the next day.
  • Make the stakes in each scene as high as you can. Look for maximum importance. Add importance, if you don’t – no one will be listening
  1. Find The Event
  • Actors frequently get so involved with character and feelings, with the subjective life of the character, that they forget about what is happening in the play. What is happening in the events of the play
  • The actor’s job is to create the events of the play
  • What are events? Events are of many natures. An event can be a change. That is the strongest kind of event. It can be a confrontation – and for every confrontation, there is always a result, a consequence for the actor to present. An event can be a climax, which is a major turning point in the lives of the characters.
  • Change can be overt or hidden, clear and outright and obvious, or subtle and obscure. Either way, the actor must keep a sharp lookout for the changes in a scene, for there can be many.
  • The more chances you create, the more alive the scene is
  • You must ask yourselves, “What happens in this scene? What are the changes?” and then you must work to create those changes. Something must happen, some change must be effected. If the playwright fails to provide it then the actor must.
  • Actors get so wrapped up in the creation of behavior that they frequently overlook what happens in the scene. Behavior is not enough unless he couples it with the forward progressive motion that comes with the creation of events. If you make nothing happen in a scene, it soon dies
  • Events can be psychological, such as the exchange of power between two characters. The more that is made into action, the more effective the reading. It is entirely up to the actors how action-filled an event can be
  1. Place
  • Most readings take place on a bare stage, which is not the most useful environment for an actor. It’s up to you to create a place, and it’s well worth doing, for it will help you immeasurably in creating a reality for your reading
  • Since you are free to choose any place you wish, in which to do this reading, it would be best to choose a place you know well. A real place from your real life, so that you don’t have to waste time on being a set designer, but will immediately know where the door is and where the sofa is and where the table and chairs are.
  • Once you have chosen the place, and see it clearly then you must look for how it makes you feel. The feeling is most important. That is what will elevate your place into emotional value
  • Question for the actor to ask: Where does this take place? How can I get mileage out of using the place in creating what I’m fighting for in this relationship? Geographical, literal place isn’t important, as long as you get the emotional use from it
  1. Game Playing & Role Playing
  • When we play games it is for real, when we take on different roles, it is sincere conduct, for it is a way of dealing with reality, not avoiding it. Don’t be fooled by the title – In class I play the role of the teacher, you play the role of the student – at a party, we all play the role of peer …
  • It helps an actor to ask him/herself in each scene: What is the game I am playing in this situation? What role do I assume in order to best play this game? The answer depends on the circumstance: what people want from you, what you want from them, what you are offering, and what you expect. Ask what the stakes are, what are you playing for. But don’t get the idea that you will therefore be unreal or insincere. Games are real; roles are necessary to deal with reality.
  • What’s the value of knowing this? Answer: If you play the role of son to your parents, you don’t play that role with your girlfriend: What would she want with a son? She wants a lover. So you play that role because it is the role she wants from you. But you don’t play it insincerely, since you love her. It is a role and it is for real.
  • Every relationship we have demanded a different role, in order to be successfully fulfilled. Every situation we are in is a game with different rules. All real. All meaningful to us. The rules of the game tell us how to act in a life situation, don’t they? So they also tell actors how to “act.”
  • Always choose to do the role you play well: there’s always room in the scene to show conflict, events, opposites
  1. Mystery and Secret
  • After you’ve done all the eleven guideposts in your preparation for your audition, then add to it what you don’t know
  • The most fascinating acting always has a quality of mystery to it.
  • Think of some of the questions man has pondered since the beginning of time: What is love? Is there a God? Is there life after death? No matter how much science finds out, we never know the answers to these questions. They eternally remain mysteries to us. So it is with any relationship you create: No matter how much we know about the other person, there is always something going in that other heart and that other head that we don’t know but can only ponder. And no matter how we explain ourselves to someone else, no matter how open we are, there is always still something inexplicable, something hidden and unknown in us, too
  • Add to your audition this wonderment about what is going on inside of you. These are feelings, mysterious feelings, that cannot be verbalized and cannot be explained. But they can be felt and therefore they can be added to your audition
  • Always have a secret for your character and tell no one – this will help create the mystery

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Consider the following statistics about marriage in the United States:

undefined

  • As of 2014, the average age of first marriage for women was 27.9, and for men it was 29.6, which has changed substantially over time (Anderson & Payne, 2016).
  • The average duration of marriages in 2015 was 8 years.
  • Men, on average, report being happier in their marriages than women. Similarly, married men report the highest life satisfaction, which is followed by married women, single men, and single women. In short, marriage is good for men!

undefined

Most of you have likely had the experience of being a guest at a wedding, or you may have even been a member of a wedding party yourself. Wedding ceremonies are often filled with hope for the new couple. On the other hand, attending weddings may also cause you to wonder what makes a marriage succeed or fail. A prominent marriage scholar who has examined this question in great detail is Dr. John Gottman, a professor at the University of Washington and one of the foremost researchers of marital quality. His body of research involves careful, systematic observation of couples in a longitudinal study. Through this work, which you examine this week, Gottman has been able to make conclusions about why some couples drift apart and why other couples not only stay together but also build strong unions.

undefined

Gottman made a key decision in his work not to use questionnaires as a tool to assess marriages. Why?

undefined

  1. Put simply, people can lie on questionnaires.
  2. People are often not aware of their communication style, so they have difficulty answering questions about it.

undefined

Instead, Gottman has chosen to use other research tools in his research lab, called the “Love Lab.” He conducts a Marital Interaction Assessment, which involves the couple having a 15-minute discussion about a recent cause of conflict. During this Marital Interaction Assessment, Gottman assesses the following:

undefined

  • Facial expression, voice tone, and body language
  • Positive affect, including humor, affection, validation, and joy
  • Negative affect, including disgust, contempt, criticism, belligerence, domineering, defensiveness, whining, tension, fear, anger, and sadness
  • Physiological measures, including heart rate, pulse, palmar skin conductance, gross motor movement, and blood assays (samples) to determine one’s immune response.

undefined

You can see a video of Gottman explaining the tools of the trade he uses when he studies marital couples in this week’s optional Learning Resources.

undefined

Gottman’s research allows him to be able to predict whether or not a couple will get divorced with 94% accuracy after watching them have a conflictual discussion (Gottman, Coan, Carrere, & Swanson, 1998). Gottman would say that the way a couple argues can tell you a lot about the future of their relationship.

undefined

In order to complete this Assignment, you watch a series of videos in which Gottman discusses his research findings. The purpose of this Assignment is to have you apply what we have learned about intimacy in developmental research to a specific romantic relationship that you know well.

undefined

undefined

To Prepare:

undefined

  • View the video segments Making Relationships Work: Parts 1–4, featuring John Gottman.
  • Select either your own romantic relationship (either previous or current) or a romantic relationship that you know well (parents, siblings’ marriages, etc.) for this Assignment.
  • Review at least 2 other scholarly articles by researchers other than John Gottman on intimacy and marriage in adulthood.

undefined

The Assignment (3–4 pages): Provide an analysis of the relationship through the lens of developmental research. Specifically, use the following guidelines:

undefined

Analysis of Gottman Research

undefined

  • Briefly describe the relationship you selected. Explain positive aspects of the relationship as well as challenges.
  • Provide an analysis of this relationship through Gottman’s research.
  • Explain factors that contribute to relationship satisfaction according to Gottman. What links to his research can you identify for social development in adulthood in general and this couple specifically?
  • What advice would Gottman give to the couple you selected based on his research?

undefined

Analysis of Other Intimacy Research

undefined

  • Use your 2 identified scholarly articles that examine romantic relationship dynamics. Explain factors that contribute to relationship satisfaction according to these articles. What links to his research can you identify for social development in adulthood in general and this couple specifically?

undefined

Comparison of Research

undefined

  • Finally, explain how these different researchers’ contributions give us unique insight into relationship dynamics.

undefined

Gottman Institute. (2009a). Making relationships work. John Gottman [Video file].

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Please add one or two arguments in the doc (please see screenshots.) And base on the one or two arguments to do some slides of powerpoint.(Just two to three slides).

85C (2021) Group Assignment: Privacy on the Internet

Mobile apps, social networks, internet service providers, phone networks, and others online collect as much as they can in order to monetize such data. The lectures and screenings and readings for 85c touch on privacy as a contentious issue in media studies, including but not limited to questions regarding customer approval (explicit opt-in or opt-out, vs covert or implicit aggregation), advertising models, data security, etc. On one side, you have online media collecting copious amounts of customer information (device identifiers, advertising identifiers, location data, user interests, content you create, etc). On the other side, you have advocates calling for the protection of personally identifiable information (your contacts, location, interests, and other behavioral data, your household information, date and place of birth, etc). Regulatory frameworks differ in stipulating how consumers should be able to exercise certain rights in their interactions with media platforms, but they serve us as starting points for considering consumer privacy protections. Inversely, regulatory frameworks also stipulate that a business is allowed to collect and use personal information to provide the core functionality of a service or application.

This group project will have you team up to research, present, and debate the most salient aspects of consumer privacy online. Documenting each of the three steps will earn your group academic credit in this class. Each step will take place partly in the 85C discussion sections and partly in between meetings.

Each 85C discussion section will be divided into four groups for this project. Groups 1a and 1b will research, present, and debate a Californian case (or an international app hoping to do business in in California); groups 2a and 2b will study a European case (or an international app hoping to do business in Europe). Groups 1a and 2a will act as lobbyists for an app (which could be a real or imaginary game, dating app, or messaging service); groups 1b and 2b will act as policy advisers advocating privacy protections via regulations.

Group 2a: You are industry lobbyists trying to convince a European Legislature of your position (your classmates are European politicians). As you define your position, please refer to the GDPR. What does the imposition of these regulations mean to your users, to the cost of your app, to your online advertising business model? Present your most persuasive arguments against regulation.

Resources

– News Coverage

Cory Doctorow, “The Curious Case of Internet Privacy (Links to an external site.),” MIT Technology Review (June 6, 2012)

Cameron F. Kerry and John B. Morris, “Why data ownership is the wrong approach to protecting privacy (Links to an external site.)” Brookings (June 26, 2019)

Salvador Rodriguez, “Facebook strikes back against Apple privacy change, prompts users to accept tracking to get ‘better ads experience’ (Links to an external site.)“, CNBC (Feb 1, 2021)

Kate Cox, “Virginia is about to get a major California-style data privacy law (Links to an external site.)” Ars Technica (Feb 11, 2021)

Drew Fitzgerald, “T-Mobile to Step Up Ad Targeting of Cellphone Customers (Links to an external site.)Wall Street Journal (March 9, 2021)

Lauren Sarkesian and Spandana Singh, “Your Dating App Data Might Be Shared With the U.S. Government (Links to an external site.)Slate (March 5, 2021)

Joseph Cox, “Military Unit That Conducts Drone Strikes Bought Location Data From Ordinary Apps (Links to an external site.)Vice (March 4, 2021)

Kara Swisher, “Apple’s C.E.O. Is Making Very Different Choices From Mark ZuckerbergThe New York Times (April 5, 2021)

– Regulatory frameworks

  1. Europe: GDPR (Links to an external site.)
  2. USA: FCC Broadband Privacy Order (Links to an external site.)
  3. California: CCPA (Links to an external site.)
  4. United Nations General Assembly: The right to privacy in the digital age (Links to an external site.)

– Background readings

  1. University of California Privacy Principles (Links to an external site.)
  2. Congressional Research Service – Privacy Protections for Personal Information Online (Links to an external site.)
  3. Cybertelecom – Privacy (Links to an external site.)
  4. Pew Charitable Trust – The Future of Privacy (Links to an external site.)
  5. FTC – Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

In 3 pages, please use concepts from the course to reflect on the issue addressed by the film, your critique of the author’s message, and relevant conclusions about whether and how the film helped illustrate concepts, ideas, or approaches from this course.

1.) Discuss the social justice issue addressed and the key factors that produce this issue (according to the film), eg what elements or factors are involved in producing this problem? Who are the key players? Who is impacted? Who benefits? Who is hurt? Are there any bystanders?

2.) State in a sentence or two the main message, call-to-action or solution you saw being offered by the film. Also include a summary of your response and to what extent you agree or disagree with the film’s message or approach, providing specific examples from the film, and examples from course concepts to make your point.

3.)How has critiquing the film added to your understanding of the issues we are addressing in this course? Please use at least two references from course materials to make your conclusions.

Note on written assignments: Written assignments are not only to hand in for a grade, they are also meant to be brought in to class and used in class writing workshops, so please bring your work to class even if it is unfinished, as this will be crucial to receiving full points for the writing assignments. It is acceptable that your writings be a work-in-progress when you bring them to class, but it is essential to the process of the course that you bring a written piece to those classes indicated. You will have until 11:59 pm on the due date to finalize your written compositions to submit to the course website, unless you choose to utilize the 24 hour grace period for any written assignments listed below under policies for late work (in which case please email these to me, I will confirm receipt).

Note on Citations: Citations of course references should be in text, in parentheses, or in footnotes, and at minimum should include the author, title, and year (where applicable), and if quotations are used, the page number. Citations may conform to any disciplinary style you choose (e.g. APA, MLA), so long as you use one style consistently. If you use additional sources from the internet please also include a hyperlink or web address so that I can view them (can be in parentheses). ***Not advisable to put large quotes in your papers***, also you can refer to certain parts of the film using the time stamp, eg (5:16) .


Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Hello, tomorrow I have this upper division sociology course assignment due at 5pm PST, and it’s about – What role the US should play in Iraq (Afghanistan)? Please select this question if you have a strong understanding and background in the US-Middle Eastern foreign relations and events that took place. This assignment is relatively short, but is meant to have a lot of information packed in.

There is 5 important key steps to follow while writing this policy brief. Please include all 5 steps while responding to the prompt, it’s very important.

#1. Whats your role? (Role is give this time: head of the Middle East desk of the US State Dept ) #2 What is needed to be decided? #3 Background (information relative to issue) **#4 Detailed options on how to respond to problem. (should have at least 3 different options) **#5 Proposal- which option do you think is the best

Prompt:

What role should the US play in Iraq (OR Afghanistan) after the US troops are withdrawn? Give a) background, b) options), c) your recommendation. You have 500 words and may write in bullet point phrases or in full sentences. Choose EITHER Iraq OR Afghanistan (but NOT both).

You already know the question, and what role you are playing– you are to act as if you are the head of the Middle East desk of the US State Dept and asked to give advice on what role the US should play in Iraq (or Afghanistan, if you choose that option) after US troops have been withdrawn. Keep in mind the security needs of the US to prevent the rise of anti-American terrorist organizations and the concern for human rights and democratic institutions. Also be aware of the Sunni-Shi’a divisions and the influence of the Saudis and Iran in the region.

Your policy brief should be short and to the point. You can use phrases and bullet points, or write in full sentences. You have to cover three things: a) the background to the problem, identifying the major social and historical issues that are important at present; b) several possible options in responding (usually three, but it can be from 2 to 4 options); and c) your recommendation, including why you think it’s better than the others (or perhaps a combination of some of them) and why you think it would work. You can write the policy brief as a single essay, though it is probably sensible to break it into the three sections: background, options, and recommendation. Do not write more than 500 words.

You should refer to the readings for the course and the lectures, but do not need to have full citations. You can just say “as was mentioned in the lecture,” or “in the article by Filkins.” You can also refer to books, articles, or news items as well, by citing them like this: “as the New York Times reported,” or “on the al Jazeera website it said.”

You can refer to your notes. But do not try to upload a pre-written file since the site will not accept it.

If you have any questions before the assignment send me an email. If you have an questions during it, use the chat function.

Reading- https://www.npr.org/transcripts/156504634 https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2011/01/13/way-ou… https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/the-dilem…

Please let me know if you have any questions thank you.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

This should be like a journal you keep for your character you are creating, do not write as if you’re trying to say what you think I want you to say, this is your own personal creation. Again, it should be like YOUR CHARACTER’S DIARY! Take risks, go to the dark and dirty places your character goes, remember there is nothing politically correct about the personal choices characters make – be completely flushed out and real. You are playing the part, no one else will have your monologue. Take RISKS and Go THERE! Just memorizing your lines does not mean you are acting, you have to fill it with real-life choices. Be specific and HAVE FUN! Must write a paragraph minimum for EACH question!

ATTACHED IS THE SCRIPT WHERE YOU WILL FIND CHARACTERS





  1. Relationship
  • Creating a relationship is the heart of acting
  • What is your relationship with the other character in the scene?
  • Facts are never enough, they help you begin – help you create the relationship
  • Once you have the fact, you are ready to explore how you feel about the other character; either the one spoken to or spoken about
  • Ask questions about your emotional attitude towards this person – Do you love him, hate him, resent him, how much, do you want to help him, what do you want from him, ect…?
  • The fact of a relationship has no value to the actor unless it leads him/her to explore the feeling in the relationship NOW – the now is the imperative question you must ask
  • You must commit 1000%
  1. Conflict, What are you fighting for?
  • Without conflict, there is no scene
  • What do you WANT in this scene?
  • Instead of using goals or motivations, use what are you fighting for?
  • It will keep you active and at the moment, without causing you to give up
  • Always have a positive want(motivation) – it’s more forceful, stronger, and will serve you in a more emotional way than a negative choice
  • It makes the stakes higher
  • How, then, do you achieve balance if everyone is there pitching hard for what they’re fighting for? Through relationship. Through the give and take and consideration of other characters, through your sensitivity to their reactions towards what you’re fighting for- through increased awareness of others and how you affect them and how they affect you; a heightening of the awareness you have in life toward other people
  • Maximum conflict is what you should be looking for. Who is interfering with your getting what you are fighting for? Do battle with her, fight her, woo her, charm her, revile her. Find as many ways as you can to go about getting what you are fighting for.
  • The more ways you find – them more interesting your performance will be
  • The actor must find out what the basic fight is in every character in every scene
  1. The Moment Before
  • Every scene you will ever act begins in the middle, and it is up to you, the actor, to provide what comes before.
  • This is true if you do a scene at the beginning of a play, middle, or end. Something always precedes what you are doing – the moment before
  • Be prepared in auditions, do your homework prior – it usually takes actors most of the reading to get warmed up. By the time they are, they’ve lost the attention of the auditors
  • Never does an actor need the moment before more desperately than in the audition situation
  • In order to create the moment before the actor will have to go back 10-20 years in the life of the character
  • Actors tend to generalize. Be specific! The more specific, focused you are the moment before, the better the entire scene will go
  • It requires important emotional commitment – you have to go there. Not just in your mind – you got to walk on ready to fight for what you want (substitution, etc…)
  • The first impression is the strongest impression left on the auditors. When an actor comes on stage in a performance, the first impression he makes is a lasting one on the audience. It had better be an impressive one
  • The moment before must be strong, meaty, and full; it’s got to give the actor something to feed on throughout the scene
  1. Humor
  • Humor is not a joke
  • It is the attitude toward being alive without which long ago you would have jumped off the empire state bldg.
  • Humor is not being funny
  • It is the exchange between people that makes it possible for us to get through our day
  • Humor exists even in the humorless. It is in every scene, just as in every situation in life.
  • Actors tend to take the humor out of scenes to make it dramatic – but that is the core reason that makes acting un-lifelike
  • Actors will say “how can I find humor in this scene? It’s very serious!” For the exact same reason, one would be driven to find humor in the same situation in life: because it is deadly serious and human beings cannot bear all that heavyweight, they alleviate the burden by humor
  • The heavier the situation the more humor we need
  • A lot of actors do this instinctively – but if it’s not there then the actor must make a conscious effort a find it (scripted or unscripted)
  • Humorless acting is the deadliest kind: its the hallmark of soap opera performing
  • You’ll find it in all the stars you admire
  1. Opposites
  • Whatever you decide is your motivation in a scene, the opposite of that is also true and should be in it
  • Like in life, we live with opposites – sometimes you hate the person you love ( a parent and a child). If there is a great need for someone there’s also resentment towards them because of your need for them.
  • It is the actor’s creation of opposites that develops conflict, and therefore drama, and therefore interest
  • For some reason, actors are fond of bringing on stage the resolution of a conflict, which is tidy and dead, rather than the conflict itself, which is exciting
  • This has to do with us being trained in life to avoid conflict, run from confrontations, make our painful lives as easy as we can for ourselves. But it is the process of dealing with pain the actor must put on the stage, not the fact of having solved it.
  • The more extreme the opposite the actor chooses for a scene, the more everything in between is likely to occur instinctively, naturally, without the actor having to consider the choices.
  • There are opposites in every scene. The actor will have to dig. The playwright may well have implied them under the surface of the character and not have written them into the dialogue at all ( subtext)
  1. Discoveries
  • Every scene is filled with discoveries, things that happen for the first time. No matter how many times it has happened in the past, there is something new about this experience, this moment.
  • It makes it active – we the audience will experience it with you
  • The discoveries may be about the other character, or about oneself, or someone offstage, or about the situation now or the situation as it existed ten years ago and how the effects the now
  • The more discoveries you make in a scene- the less you rely on “we do this every day” – the more interesting the scene will be
  • It’s hard to bring vitality and life to routine, but they are difficult to escape when you have the excitement of discoveries
  • Take nothing for granted; make an emotional discovery as often as you can find one in a scene – ask yourself what is knew
  • Actors need to work from real-life situations, not literary or character concepts. Most often the discoveries aren’t written on the surface of the script, the actor will have to dig into the subtext to find them. They come out of the actor’s own life questions
  1. Communication and Competition
  • Communication
  • Acting is communicating
  • It is not enough for the actor to feel if that feeling is not being communicated
  • It takes two to communicate. The sender and the receiver. The receiver has to acknowledge the message by sending a reply back to the sender, thus completing the circle before communication has taken place. It’s a cycle
  • You can not go forward without the cycle being completed – cause then you’re just talking and neither of you is in the moment
  • LISTEN to one another – what was just said, how did that make you feel, what are you going to do about it? It is much more than just exchanging words.
  • Receiving the feelings of another is even harder than sending out feelings of your own. It requires sensitivity, a heightened awareness of another person, investment of real caring; otherwise, why will you undertake the formidable task of opening yourself up to true communication?
  • Granted in life we’re not always talking to people but at them, and rarely do we listen- we just want to get our point across.
  • Feel the need to listen for selfish reasons
  • Communication is the desire to change the person to whom you communicating
  • Competition
  • All dramatic relationships are competitive; there’s a lot of resistance.
  • There are two points of view with which an actor should execute each scene (a) I am right and you are wrong (b) You should change from being the way you are to the way I think you should be
  • No games are any fun unless the participants are competing
  • We compete for everything: to tell the funniest story, to be considered the most truthful or sincere, the prettiest, the sexiest, the most reliable. We compete for enough food, for jobs, for love, affection, friends, and lovers. There isn’t anything for which we don’t compete.
  • Competition is healthy, it’s life
  • A good actor is the one who competes, willingly, and enjoys the competition
  1. Importance
  • Plays are written about the most important moments in people’s lives, not about their everyday humdrumness. If that was the case who would leave home to go and pay they ridiculous prices to watch a play
  • Raise the stakes: make it a Life or Death situation
  • The truth is not enough, if it is neither dramatic, interesting nor unique – it must be invested with sufficient emotion to make it important
  • It is important for an actor to realize that what he/she must use in their acting is the opposite of what he/she has been trained in life to seek. Peacefulness and the avoidance of trouble won’t help them in their acting. It is just the opposite they must seek
  • Important does not necessarily mean significant to others. It means emotionally important to you at this moment. We make trivial things important to us in the moment, even if we forget them the next day.
  • Make the stakes in each scene as high as you can. Look for maximum importance. Add importance, if you don’t – no one will be listening
  1. Find The Event
  • Actors frequently get so involved with character and feelings, with the subjective life of the character, that they forget about what is happening in the play. What is happening in the events of the play
  • The actor’s job is to create the events of the play
  • What are events? Events are of many natures. An event can be a change. That is the strongest kind of event. It can be a confrontation – and for every confrontation, there is always a result, a consequence for the actor to present. An event can be a climax, which is a major turning point in the lives of the characters.
  • Change can be overt or hidden, clear and outright and obvious, or subtle and obscure. Either way, the actor must keep a sharp lookout for the changes in a scene, for there can be many.
  • The more chances you create, the more alive the scene is
  • You must ask yourselves, “What happens in this scene? What are the changes?” and then you must work to create those changes. Something must happen, some change must be effected. If the playwright fails to provide it then the actor must.
  • Actors get so wrapped up in the creation of behavior that they frequently overlook what happens in the scene. Behavior is not enough unless he couples it with the forward progressive motion that comes with the creation of events. If you make nothing happen in a scene, it soon dies
  • Events can be psychological, such as the exchange of power between two characters. The more that is made into action, the more effective the reading. It is entirely up to the actors how action-filled an event can be
  1. Place
  • Most readings take place on a bare stage, which is not the most useful environment for an actor. It’s up to you to create a place, and it’s well worth doing, for it will help you immeasurably in creating a reality for your reading
  • Since you are free to choose any place you wish, in which to do this reading, it would be best to choose a place you know well. A real place from your real life, so that you don’t have to waste time on being a set designer, but will immediately know where the door is and where the sofa is and where the table and chairs are.
  • Once you have chosen the place, and see it clearly then you must look for how it makes you feel. The feeling is most important. That is what will elevate your place into emotional value
  • Question for the actor to ask: Where does this take place? How can I get mileage out of using the place in creating what I’m fighting for in this relationship? Geographical, literal place isn’t important, as long as you get the emotional use from it
  1. Game Playing & Role Playing
  • When we play games it is for real, when we take on different roles, it is sincere conduct, for it is a way of dealing with reality, not avoiding it. Don’t be fooled by the title – In class I play the role of the teacher, you play the role of the student – at a party, we all play the role of peer …
  • It helps an actor to ask him/herself in each scene: What is the game I am playing in this situation? What role do I assume in order to best play this game? The answer depends on the circumstance: what people want from you, what you want from them, what you are offering, and what you expect. Ask what the stakes are, what are you playing for. But don’t get the idea that you will therefore be unreal or insincere. Games are real; roles are necessary to deal with reality.
  • What’s the value of knowing this? Answer: If you play the role of son to your parents, you don’t play that role with your girlfriend: What would she want with a son? She wants a lover. So you play that role because it is the role she wants from you. But you don’t play it insincerely, since you love her. It is a role and it is for real.
  • Every relationship we have demanded a different role, in order to be successfully fulfilled. Every situation we are in is a game with different rules. All real. All meaningful to us. The rules of the game tell us how to act in a life situation, don’t they? So they also tell actors how to “act.”
  • Always choose to do the role you play well: there’s always room in the scene to show conflict, events, opposites
  1. Mystery and Secret
  • After you’ve done all the eleven guideposts in your preparation for your audition, then add to it what you don’t know
  • The most fascinating acting always has a quality of mystery to it.
  • Think of some of the questions man has pondered since the beginning of time: What is love? Is there a God? Is there life after death? No matter how much science finds out, we never know the answers to these questions. They eternally remain mysteries to us. So it is with any relationship you create: No matter how much we know about the other person, there is always something going in that other heart and that other head that we don’t know but can only ponder. And no matter how we explain ourselves to someone else, no matter how open we are, there is always still something inexplicable, something hidden and unknown in us, too
  • Add to your audition this wonderment about what is going on inside of you. These are feelings, mysterious feelings, that cannot be verbalized and cannot be explained. But they can be felt and therefore they can be added to your audition
  • Always have a secret for your character and tell no one – this will help create the mystery

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

You will organize the paper into sections with the following subtitles:

  • Public Health Problem
  • How to Solve the Problem
  • Challenges in the Future

Those sections need to include the following information.

  • Public Health Problem
    • In which you describe the problem and why it is a public health problem
    • Where, when, and how did this happen?
      • This will be different for each problem, as some are centuries old and some are specifically recent. Some are the result of recent human industry, and others are viral mutations. Explain accordingly.
    • What are the biological and/or psychological ways this harms human health?
    • When and why did this problem become an issue of concern for public health?
      • Be specific about when and where people focused on public health got involved.
  • How to Solve the Public Health Problem
    • In which you describe public healthinterventions or policies used to solve the problem.
    • Include two past attempts to solve the problem, explaining why they are not done anymore or done differently.
    • Include two recent methods, explaining why they are more effective (or less, as the case may be).
  • Challenges in the Future: What are the challenges of preventing the problem from recurring or getting worse?
    • In which you explain the key challenges in preventing the problem from reoccurring or getting worse
    • Provide two ways to prevent the recurrence or worsening of the problem, explaining the challenges to implementing these solutions.
    • Conclude by providing your opinion on how to meet these challenges and prevent this problem in the future, giving two examples.

References:

  • At least six references
  • You can have more!
  • At least four must be scholarly references
  • All six must be cited in the paper
  • Read “Writing and Research Resources and Links” in the Short Research Paper Module.

Formatting:

Quotes, Canvas, and Turnitin.com

Quotations are not allowed.

  • If you use a quotation, 10 points will be deducted EACH time.
  • An example of a quote: In class, Dr. Gideonse said, “Quotations are not allowed.”
  • Obviously, plagiarism is not allowed either. Be sure to paraphrase carefully and correctly.
  • Please go through the paraphrasing resources provided here: Writing and Research Resources and Links.

You will submit your paper through Canvas. Canvas is automatically linked to Turnitin. Do not submit your paper directly to Turnitin.com. You will be able to submit your paper to Turnitin multiple times before your final submission to check your own score and revise accordingly.

Below is the deduction for various similarity scores.

  • We will examine reports for scores above 5% and only deduct points if we believe the writing is problematic enough to warrant it; we will notdeduct points because of matches of the name of the class, a long acronym, or a student’s name.
Turnitin Score Deduction
0-5% similarity score 0
>5-10% similarity score -10
>10-15% similarity score -20
>15-20% similarity score -30
>20-25% similarity score -40
>25% similarity score -150

Grading Rubric

Required Elements Points
Topic (submitted previously) 5
Cover Page 5
1250 -1500 words 15
Correct formatting 5
APA citation format and works cited page 10
Public Health Problem
Where, when, and how did this happen? 15
What are the biological and/or psychological ways this harms human health? 10
When and why did this problem become an issue of concern for public health? 10
How to Solve the Problem
Include two past attempts to solve the problem, explaining why they are not done anymore or done differently. 20
Include two specific recent public health solutions, explaining why they are more effective (or less, as the case may be). 20
Challenges in the Future
Provide two ways to prevent the recurrence or worsening of the problem, explaining the challenges to implementing these solutions. 20
Conclude by providing your opinion on how to meet these challenges and prevent of this problem in the future, giving two examples. 15
TOTAL 150

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Section 5.1: 10

Section 5.2: 4, 9, 10

Section 6.1: 2

Section 6.3: 6

Remark. In exercise 6.3.3 you may draw the nullclines to check that the origin is the

only xed point.

Section 6.4: 1

Exercise A

For the nonlinear ODEs in (a)-(c), please…

… show that the origin is the only xed point. What type of phase portrait does the

linearization predict near the xed point?

… use a computer program to draw the actual phase portrait. Does it look like the

prediction of the linear system?

(a) x_ = x2, y_ = y

(b) x_ = y, y_ = x2

(c) x_ = x2 + xy, y_ = 1

2y2 + xy

5.1.10 (Attracting and Liapunov stable) Here are the official definitions of the

various types of stability. Consider a fixed point x* of a system x􀀅 􀀞 f(x).

We say that x* is attracting if there is a 􀁅 􀀟 0 such that lim

t→∞

x(t) = x* whenever

||x(0) 􀀎 x*|| 􀀝 􀁅. In other words, any trajectory that starts within a distance 􀁅 of x*

is guaranteed to converge to x* eventually. As shown schematically in Figure 1,

trajectories that start nearby are allowed to stray from x* in the short run, but they

must approach x* in the long run.

In contrast, Liapunov stability requires that nearby trajectories remain close for

all time. We say that x* is Liapunov stable if for each 􀁆 􀀟 0, there is a 􀁅 􀀟 0 such that

||x( t ) 􀀎 x*|| 􀀝 􀁆 whenever t 􀁰 0 and ||x(0) 􀀎 x*|| 􀀝 􀁅. Thus, trajectories that start

within 􀁅 of x* remain within 􀁆 of x* for all positive time (Figure 1):

radius radius

Attracting Liapunov stable

radius

(0) (0)

x x

x x

* *

= δ = ε = δ

Figure 1

Finally, x* is asymptotically stable if it is both attracting and Liapunov stable.

For each of the following systems, decide whether the origin is attracting,

Liapunov stable, asymptotically stable, or none of the above.

a) x􀀅 = y, y􀀅 =−4x. b) x􀀅 􀀞 2y, y􀀅 􀀞 x

c) x􀀅 􀀞 0, y􀀅 􀀞 x d) x􀀅 = 0, y􀀅 =−y

e) x􀀅 =−x, y􀀅 =−5y f) x􀀅 􀀞 x, y􀀅 􀀞 y

Plot the phase portrait and classify the fixed point of the following linear systems.

If the eigenvectors are real, indicate them in your sketch.

5.2.3 x.. = y, y.. =.2x.3y 5.2.4 x.. =5x+10y, y.. =.x.y

5.2.5 x.. =3x.4y, y.. = x.y 5.2.6 x.. =.3x+2y, y.. = x.2y

5.2.7 x.. =5x+2y, y.. =.17x.5y 5.2.8 x.. =.3x+4y, y.. =.2x+3y

5.2.9 x.. = 4x.3y, y.. =8x.6y 5.2.10 x.. = y, y.. =.x.2y.

6.1 Phase Portraits

For each of the following systems, find the fixed points. Then sketch the nullclines,

the vector field, and a plausible phase portrait.

6.1.2 x.. = x.x3 , y.. =.y

6.3 Fixed Points and Linearization

For each of the following systems, find the fixed points, classify them, sketch the

neighboring trajectories, and try to fill in the rest of the phase portrait.

6.3.6 x􀀅 = xy−1, y􀀅 = x−y3

6.4 Rabbits versus Sheep

Consider the following “rabbits vs. sheep” problems, where x, y 􀁰 0. Find the fixed

points, investigate their stability, draw the nullclines, and sketch plausible phase

portraits. Indicate the basins of attraction of any stable fixed points.

6.4.1 x􀀅 = x(3−x−y), y􀀅 = y(2−x−y)

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

In several jurisdictions to include North Carolina, mentally ill inmates have died while confined in restrictive housing or because of being housed in restrictive housing. If you were a prison administrator faced with maintaining order in a correctional environment, and many of those in your population were seriously mentally ill, how would you propose to ensure accountability for rule violations at the same time managing their mental illness?

Read: “Solitary Confinement: The Law Today and the Way Forward,” Law and Psychology Review, 37(211) 2013.

Review: “Solitary Confinement as Torture,” UNC School of Law, ACLU, 2014.

Read: “Solitary Confinement: Is Long-term isolation of prisoners inhumane?” CQ Researcher, SAGE, 22(32) 2012.

Read: “The Effects of Solitary Confinement on Prison Inmates: A Brief History and Review of the Literature,” Crime and Justice 34(1): 441-528, 2006.

Read: “Restrictive Housing in the U.S., Issues, Challenges, and Future Directions”, (2016). Washington, DC, National Institute of Justice, U. S. Department of Justice.

Review: American Correctional Association Committee Report on Restrictive Housing,

Read: Mandela Rule on Solitary Confinement

Watch: You Tube Video – “Man Forgotten in Solitary Confinement for Years.”

Watch: You Tube Video – “Solitary Confinement: No Way Out of the Monster Factory.”

Watch: You Tube Video – “After 4 Decades in Solitary, Dying Angola 3 Prisoner Herman Wallace Freed, Conviction Overturned.

Read: Cloud, D., Drucker, E., Browne, A., & Parsons, J. (“2015, January). “Public health and solitary confinement in the U. S.” American Journal of Public Health, 105(1), 18-26.

Arriro, B. & Bullock, J. (2008 December). “The psychological effects of solitary confinement on prisoners in supermax units: reviewing what we know and recommending what should change”, Int J Offender The Comp Criminal, (6), 622-640.

Metzner, J. & Fellner, J. (2010). 38(1), 104-108.

Read: Bulman, P. (June/July 2012) “The Psychological Effects of Solitary Confinement”, Alexandria, VA, Corrections Today, American Correctional Association.

Read: Hogan, B., et. al. (2018 April). “History of Solitary Confinement is Associated with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms among Individuals Recently Released from Prison”. Journal of Urban Health, 95(2), 146-148.

Read: Lanes, E., (2011 October). Are the “worst of the worst” self-injurious prisoners more likely to end up in long-term maximum-security administrative segregation?, Int J Offender Therapy, Comparative Criminology, 55(7), 1034-1050.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

2. For each of the following, either give an example and prove why it is an

example or prove why such an example is impossible.

(a) An innite set A with no limit points.

(b) A family of compact sets (Kn) contained in [0; 1] such that

S1

n=1 Kn is not compact.

(c) A sequence (xn) for which the subsequences (x2n) and (x2n+1) converge, but (xn)

does not converge.

(d) A sequence (xn) of positive terms for which the series

P1

n=1 xn converges and the

series

P1

n=1

nxn

n+1 diverges.

(e) A continuous function f : [0; 2] ! R that has no maximum value.

(f) A continuous function on [a; b] with range a subset of Q.

(g) A function f : [a; b] ! R which is continuous on [a; b] and dierentiable on (a; b) for

which there exits c 2 (a; b) such that f0(c) = 0 and f does not have an extremum

at c.

(h) A function f : [a; b] ! R for which jfj is Riemann integrable on [a; b], but f is not

Riemann integrable on [a; b].

3. Dene the function

ha(x) =

(

xa if x > 0;

0 if x 0:

where a is a real constant.

(a) (3 points) For what values of a is ha continuous at 0?

(b) (4 points) For what values of a is ha dierentiable at 0?

(c) (3 points) For what values of a is the derivative function h0

a continuous on R?

Make sure to show all your work.

4. Let K R be compact and f : K ! R be continuous. In the following problem, we will

show that for every ” > 0, there exists M(“) > 0 such that for all x; y 2 K we have

jf(x) .. f(y)j M(“)jx .. yj + “:

(a) (3 points) We will argue by contradiction. Show that if the above statement does

not hold, there exists “0 > 0 and sequences (xn); (yn) in K such that

jf(xn) .. f(yn)j > njxn .. ynj + “0:

Hint: Proceed inductively.

(b) (2 points) Given your sequences (xn) and (yn) as above, show that there are sub-

sequences (xnk) and (ynk ), such that xnk ! x0 2 K and ynk ! y0 2 K.

(c) (5 points) Using parts (a) and (b), arrive at a contradiction by considering the

cases when x0 = y0 or x0 6= y0.

5. (a) (3 points) Using the identity

log(1 + x) =

x

0

1

1 + t

dt for all x 0;

show that there exists ` : [0;1) ! [0;1) such that, for every 0 x 1,

log(1 + x) = x ?

x2

2

+ `(x);

where

`(x)

x3

3

:

Hint: You do not need to use Taylor series (which we never covered). Try exploiting

that 1

1+t = 1 ? t

1+t .

(b) (3 points) For n 2 N, let (xn) denote the sequence

xn = 1 +

1

2

+ : : : +

1

n

? log n:

Using part (a), or otherwise, show that for any n 2 N, we have

jxn+1 ? xnj

2

n2 +

1

3n3 :

(c) (3 points) Using part (b), or otherwise, show that the sequence (xn) converges.

(d) (3 points) Show that

lim

n!1

1

log n

Xn

k=1

1

k

= 1:

6. (9 points) Prove using the “? denition of continuity that f(x) = x3?3×2+x?1

is continuous on R.

Hint: You may nd the following inequality from  helpful: for any a; b 2 R,

we have ab 1

2a2 + 1

2b2.

7. Given a function f : [a; b] ! R and a partition P = fa = t0 < : : : < tn = bg of [a; b], let

V(f;P) :=

Xn

j=1

jf(tj) ? f(tj?1)j:

We then dene

V (f) := sup

P

V(f;P);

where supremum is over all partitions P of [a; b]. In the following, we further assume

that f is continuously dierentiable on [a; b] (i.e. f0 exists and is a continuous function

on [a; b])

(a) (4 points) Using the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, show that

V (f)

b

a

jf0(x)jdx:

(b) (5 points) Using the Mean Value Theorem (for derivatives), establish the reverse

inequality:

V (f)

b

a

jf0(x)jdx:

Remark: Combining parts (a) and (b), we get the equality

V (f) =

b

a

jf0(x)jdx:

8. (a) (5 points) Let A R be a non-empty, bounded set. Show that

supA .. inf A = sup

x;y2A

jx .. yj;

where the supremum is taken over all pairs x; y 2 A. You need to argue why both

sides of the above inequality exist and are nite to begin with.

(b) (3 points) Show that f : [a; b] ! R is Riemann integrable on [a; b] if and only if for

every ” > 0, there exists a partition P = fa = t0 < < tn = bg of [a; b] such that

Xn

j=1

sup

x;y2[tj..1;tj ]

jf(x) .. f(y)j(tj .. tj..1) < “:

(c) (5 points) Let f : [c; d] ! R be continuous on [c; d] and g : [a; b] ! [c; d] be Riemann

integrable on [a; b]. Show that the composition f g is Riemann integrable on [a; b].

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

I’m working on a asian studies question and need a sample draft to help me understand better.

The length of the essay should be eight to ten pages (Times New Roman 12, double-spaced).

The title of the work you are referencing and the corresponding page number should be given in parentheses in the main text [example: (The Gotha Programme, 16)].

You are expected to write a carefully reasoned, clearly argued essay that reflects a firm grasp of the reading materials. In the introduction of your essay, you should clearly state what your main argument is. We have read about various ideas of translation and related issues over the quarter.

We started with Roman Jakobson’s treatise, which examines the issue of translation from the perspective of linguistics and George Steiner’s essay, which discusses the four modes of the hermeneutic motion involved in the course of translation. In contrast to Jakobson’s linguistic and Steiner’s hermeneutic approaches, Lydia Liu calls attention to the intervention of political forces in the process of translation in the context of colonialism. By drawing on the Marxian ideas of exchange value and use value, she examines the ways in which unequal power dynamics between the West and the non-West conditioned the establishment of equivalence between languages in the course of translation. On the other hand, Naoki Sakai takes up the issue of translation by discussing two different attitudes toward one’s relationship with the other; homolingual address and heterolingual address. Ultimately, he criticizes the conventional idea of translation, which in his view reifies the boundaries of nation states, and offers his theory of translation as a venue for destabilizing the subjectivity, which is inseparably coupled with the nation state. From the political approaches of Liu and Sakai, we moved on to Emmanuel Levinas’s ethics. By criticizing the tradition of Western thought, which views discourse as conversation between two interlocutors sharing common ground for understanding, Levinas looks at discourse as the site of ethics in which “the I” (the self) reaches out to “the thou” (the other), who does not share anything in common with the self and thus can challenge the self’s understanding of him or her. As discussed in class, such a view of discourse as the site of ethics demands that the self should hold the other higher than itself. In other words, Levinas’s ethics requires an unequal relationship between the self and the other, and thus implicitly problematizes the idea of equality (symmetrical reciprocity), which fails to take account of the self’s indefinite obligation to the other’s need. Karl Marx’s criticism of Bourgeois equality helps clarify Levinas’s critique of symmetrical reciprocity. For Marx, genuine justice can be achieved when Bourgeois equality is liquidated in favor of the Communist society in which one receives as much as one needs rather than as much as he works for. Such an ideal society can be premised only on the basis of an ethical principle akin to Levinas’s. In that sense, it is crucial to remember that Levinas warns us that we cannot but fail to uphold the other. Unlike Marx’s vision of the communist society, which will be achieved in the future, Levinas’s ethics constantly reminds us that we will ultimately fail to be completely ethical no matter how much we try. Ironically, the unavoidable failure of being ethical drives us to constantly try to be ethical in Levinas’s thought. Finally, we read Fredric Jameson’s theory of third-world literature as national allegory and Aijaz Ahmad’s rebuttal of it. Attempting to grapple with the radical difference of third world culture, Jameson in the end advocates it. In his view, unlike in Western culture and literature, there is no split between the private and the public, between poetics and politics, and the libidinal and the social in third world culture and literature because of its historical experience of capitalism different from that of the West. Thus, third world texts manifest social totality whereas first world texts primarily reveal fragmentations of society. In response, Ahmad finds fault with Jameson’s argument that third-world literature is inevitably national allegory. His criticism especially focuses on Jameson’s limited access to third world literature through translation. Keeping in mind the issues highlighted in the above overview of the course materials, discuss in your essay which ideas of translation and the related issues presented in the course materials above Suh’s chapters advocate and criticize, and why the chapters champion certain ideas and denounce others. You are expected to demonstrate your full understanding of the course materials as well as Suh’s chapters.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

2) Construct the circuit shown using a 5V battery, resistor 100ohm,

Capacitor 10000uf, inductor and two switches (A & B)

3) For this Step we explore what happens when you open & close

Switch B (while Switch A stays open)

a) Make sure both switches are open and hit the Reset button.)

Add a scope for the capacitor.

b) Describe what happens when you close Switch B.

400Ω

c) What kind of circuit is it? (eg:RC/LC, charging/discharging)

d) What is the theoretical time constant for this circuit?

e) Use the mini graph from the scope to verify the time constant, similar to what you did for the RC Circuit (HINT: find time to get to 63% of max Voltage)

4) Now we charge up the capacitor and then discharge it into the inductor using the following:

Question 4 Setup:

i) first make sure to open both switches

ii) click Reset

iii) close Switch B until the capacitor is about 99% charged

iv) opening Switch B

You will use Question 4 Setup to reset the experiment for the rest of this question:

a) Add a second scope, this one on the inductor

b) Do Question 4 Setup then describe the behavior of the circuit. (use the scope) c) What kind of circuit is this?

d) Calculate the theoretical angular frequency (ω) of this circuit

e) Using the graph find the period of the circuit, and use it to find the angular frequency. f) Find the % difference between measured and theoretical angular frequencies

5) For this part we explore what happens when you add a resistor. a) Add a 50 ohm resistor in series with the inductor.

b) Do the Question 4 Setup & describe the behavior (use the scope) c) Make a plot of the maximum values (which is when the graph peaks above the x-axis) VS time using at least 5 maximum values

d) What does this graph show? In other words what is the meaning of this decaying maximum

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Week 4: Countermemory and Style – 2:

[Strive to post your Part 1 Individual Reflection remarks by Thursday, April 22, 11:59pm. You are encouraged to include a question to your group. Then add your Part 2 Peer Comment by Saturday, April 24, 3pm.]

In our Week Four readings by Jun Okada and Broderick Fox, we are presented with the hard-fought activism of racial minority producers to contribute documentary programming into U.S. public television, and how documentary makers can use aesthetics, or style, to create codes of meaning. Because of the contested relationship of Japanese American personal and community memories to official government and Hollywood film exhibits, we also studied the concepts of countermemory and postmemory.

With our single target film, History and Memory: For Akiko and Takashige (1991), I welcome your individual reflection (Part One), and Peer Comment (Part Two) with your peers.

A Suggested Question for your comments:

In her article on World War Two government film narratives, cinema scholar Sumiko Higashi* cautions contemporary Japanese American filmmakers from redisplaying this wartime propaganda content due to its effective melodramatic appeal and inaccurate messaging about Japanese Americans. About History and Memory: for Akiko and Takashige, Higashi writes that Tajiri’s lack of filmed visual images for her family members (mother, father, aunt, and others speak through the audio channel only or offscreen) puts the film at risk of allowing archival authority to prevail over the filmmaker’s arguments. This week’s reading author Broderick Fox asks “How can the archive be used in unique and evocative ways, rather than producing a still-image slideshow with accompanying voiceover and music?” (Fox, “Style: Audiovisualizing the Documentary,”p.87)

So, by your own experience with Rea Tajiri’s film, what do you think about searching for one’s own history for which there, for the most part, are no documented images? What do you make of Tajiri’s amalgamation of the images she CAN find? Fox and Okada call History and Memory an experimental non-fiction film. In your remarks, please share a specific example of your understanding of Tajiri’s techniques and whether or not you find it achieves a stylistic coherence for her objectives?

Make sure to integrate details, examples or citations from the source film plus and at least one other category of our Week 4 course materials, and clearly identify your sources. This means you should include at least two of the following resource types to inform your writing: (e.g. film exhibit + 1 reading , or film exhibit + 1 class lecture point, at minimum)

Unit 3 Lesson material Categories to discuss with Rea Tajiri’s film:

Reading Category:

  • Jun Okada. “The Center for Asian American Media and the Televisual Sphere.”
  • Broderick Fox. Chapter called “Style: Audiovisualizing the Documentary.” Or the Class 8 reading, section “Objectivity” within the chapter called “Reimagining Documentary.”

Class Lesson Category

  • Class 7 Zoom Class or Lesson slides
  • Class 8 Zoom Class or Lesson slides

(If you wish to discuss another take on the week’s materials, feel free to identify a different frame for your comments.)

*Source: Melodrama, Realism, and Race: World War II Newsreels and Propaganda Films.

Cinema Journal. Vol. 37, No. 3 (Spring, 1998)

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Conceptual Questions

1. Read the article \Baby-Sitting the Economy” by Paul Krugman and explain how it relates to

Keynes’s idea of involuntary employment. How is the story with the babysitters connected to the

example with apples and bananas given in class?

2. Explain in words how the Keynesian multiplier process works. Why does an increase in spending

lead to an even greater increase in total spending than the value of the initial increase?

3. Read the article \Government Spending is No Free Lunch” by Robert Barro. Why is Barro skeptical

of government spending as a way to replace private investment?

4. Explain the dierences between Hayek’s and Keynes’s views on business cycles and the role of

government intervention. In particular you should comment on what each viewed as the cause of

business cycles and what they thought the government should do during a recession. You may nd

it helpful to read the article \Friedrich August Hayek” and watch the Keynes-Hayek rap battles

(\Fear the Boom and Bust” and \Fight of the Century”).

5. What is a liquidity trap? Explain how being in a liquidity trap changes the eectiveness of monetary

and scal policy. Connect your answer to the policy response to the nancial crisis of 2008. You

may want to look at the article “The Liquidity Trap: An Alternative Explanation for Today’s Low

In

ation”

Analytical Questions

1. Assume an economy of 1000 people is described by the following equations:

Y = 10L

C = 0:75(Y 􀀀 T)

IP = 2000

G = 2000

T = 2000

a. Assuming the economy is at full employment (i.e. L = 1000), nd consumption, private

saving, public saving, and total saving

b. Assume MPC falls to 0.5 but production stays at the full employment level

i. What is unplanned investment in this scenario? What happens to inventories? How

does this aect rms’ production next period?

ii. What is consumption? What is total savings? Does total savings equal total investment?

Does total saving equal planned investment?

c. After the rm adjusts its production levels (still keeping planned investment xed at 2000),

a new equilibrium is re-established

i. What is the new equilibrium level of income? How many people will be employed?

ii. What are consumption and total savings in the new equilibrium? Did consumers accom-

plish their goal of increasing their savings? Why or why not? To answer this question,

it might be helpful to look at the reading “Wait, Is Saving Good or Bad? The Paradox

of Thrift”.

d. The government proposes a stimulus to get back to the previous level of output

i. How much does government spending have to increase (if taxes remain the same)?

ii. Does total savings change? Explain why by looking at the changes in private saving and

public saving.

2. In this question we will adjust the IS-LM curve seen in class slightly. In particular, we will assume

that taxes are taken as a percentage of income rather than as a lump sum. Then we have

C = a + b(1 􀀀 )Y

where is the percentage (between 0 and 1) of income the government collects in taxes (so that

1 􀀀 is left to the consumer). Assume that investment is a linear function of the interest rate

IP = e 􀀀 fr

And government spending is xed at G = G

a. Derive the IS curve (solve for r as a function of Y and parameters)

b. Which parameters aect the slope of the IS curve and which aect the intercept?

Now let:

a = 500; b = 0:8; = 0:25; e = 5000; f = 300; G

= 2500

c. What is the IS curve with these numbers?

d. What is output if the interest rate is 10%? What if it is 5%? 15%?

Assume money demand is given by:

Md

P

= 2Y 􀀀 1000r

And that the price level is xed at P = 1 and the money supply at Ms = 10; 000

e. What is the LM curve with these numbers?

f. Using the IS curve in part c and the LM curve in part e, nd the equilibrium interest rate

and output for this economy.

g. How much does the government collect in taxes in equilibrium? What would the new

equilibrium income if the government eliminated the income tax and instead collected a

lump sum to get the same total tax revenue?

h. Government spending increases by 500. Compare the increase in income in the model with

the income tax to the model with the lump sum tax (holding the lump sum at the value you

found in part g). Explain the economic intuition.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University Of California Los

Since his inauguration, Governor Phil Murphy signed several pieces of social legislation into law . For example, Governor Murphy signed the New Jersey Earned Sick Leave Law which requires employers in this State to provide 1 hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked up to a total of 40 hours. The law took effect October 29, 2018. The law requires employers to allow workers to take earned sick leave for their own illness, to attend a school-related event for their children, to care for other family members when they are ill and even to recover from or to deal with domestic violence situations. .https://nj.gov/labor/wagehour/lawregs/wage_and_hour_laws.html (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

Additionally, the Governor signed an extension of the New Jersey Paid Family Leave Law. The law extended the time a worker may receive paid family leave from 6 weeks at about $630 per week to 12 weeks at up to 85% of the worker’s salary up to $862 per week. Only workers contribute to the fund established for the purpose of paid family leave. The workers’ contributions will increase slightly to .012 percent of salary on income up to $124000.00. Employers with 30 or fewer workers are exempt from the law’s requirements.

For our second Forum please discuss whether you believe the government should require employers to offer their workers paid sick leave. If so, why? If not, why not? Notice that the Earned Sick Leave Law does not exempt smaller businesses such as in the Paid Family Leave Law. Should small businesses be exempt from the Earned Sick Leave law? Why or why not? Please consider the same questions for the Paid Family Leave Law. Should the government require employers to allow workers to take time off for the care of a sick family member? Should the government require, for this program, a payroll deduction from workers? If so, why? If not, why not. Should either law apply to employers with fewer than 30 workers? If so, why? If not, why not?

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

A

Hello brave souls! You are willing to tackle both Shakespeare and one of the most minimalist writers of the 20th Century, Raymond Carver. These two authors are separated by four centuries, but here they are, placed next to each other! What are they saying about love?

In your view, what is the connection between “Let me Not to the Marriage of True Minds” and “What We Talk About When We Talk About Love”? Describe the similarities and differences, and feel free to quote the text in your 250 word answer. (Note: quoted material does not count towards the word count total).

B

Welcome to the Feminist Literary Corner!

Both stories you read were penned by famous female authors of the late 19th, early 20th Century. Both Chopin and Gilman struggled mightily to gain recognition for their talents in an era when the usual focus of fiction was masculine. (If you do not believe me on this issue, please note that Chopin and Gilman were ridiculed for their work until they were re-discovered in the 1970s.)

What are some similarities and/or differences between the stories? How do these authors process their femininity? Is there any evidence of them being marginalized or oppressed by the dominant patriarchal society?

Feel free to quote the text in your 250 word answer. (Note: quoted material does not count towards the word count total).

C

Ah, the pains of youthful longing! Indeed, all of us can remember being idealistic and immature. Sometimes our dreams were out of proportion to reality, yet we always remember wistfully the beauty and innocence of those young experiences.

Both Joyce and Updike investigate the mindset of their respective protagonists, exploring what it means to be a young man. What are the similarities between the two characters? What are the elements that link these two works of 20th Century fiction? How are they in dialogue with each other?

Feel free to quote the text in your 250 word answer. (Note: quoted material does not count towards the word count total).

/

/

A. Shakespeare: “Let Me Not to the Marriage of True Minds (581); and Carver, “What We Talk About When We Talk About Love (655-665)

B. Chopin, “The Story of an Hour” (647-649) and Gilman “The Yellow Wallpaper” (231-244); see also research material on YW.

C. Joyce, “Araby” (621-626) and Updike “A&P” (626-631)

4. Respond to the Discussion Forum that corresponds to the stories you read. Respond to three peers. Please note: you do not need to respond to the discussion forum for stories you did not read. You only pick A, B, or C.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Part 1 : M9. Assignment: Avicenna’s Idea of God

Thinkers in the Medieval Period were preoccupied with problems surrounding the existence of God. Avicenna took up the problem of the necessity of God’s existence. He solves the problem by resolving a series of issues surrounding it. Our reading this week provides a good explanation of his proof and does so in only one and a half pages of text. The shortness of this argument provides us with a good opportunity to examine a complex philosophical argument and to judge its effectiveness. The author of our text explains the argument step-by-step, and shares with us both the difficulties with each step and the insight it provides.

Avicenna - Ibn Sina

Avicenna. Source: Flickr. Creative Commons.

For your assignment this week, in your own words, explain the problem Avicenna wishes to solve, and then paraphrase each of the steps in his argument and his final solution. What insights do the steps provide in our understanding of God? Can you think of any arguments that would counter Avicenna’s claim?

Submission:

  • Must be a minimum of 1 1/2 pages with standard 1-inch margins in Times New Roman or Garamond font.
  • Must be double-spaced.
  • Must address the topic of the paper with critical thought.
  • Must include in-text citations and references in MLA style. No outside resouces.
  • Name, course, and assignment top left.
  • Include a Title.

Part 2 : M9. Discussion: Descartes’ Cogito

Topic

What is it that Descartes decides he cannot doubt?

Even though he had a college education, Rene Descartes was consumed with doubts not only about religion and the nature and existence of God, but also he wondered about reality itself. In his Meditations, he tells us of his resolve to doubt everything he knows until he gets to something he knows for sure. He explains what he discovers in his First Mediation. What is that something? Do you think the reasoning he uses within the meditation is sound? Explain the steps he uses to get to his conclusion.

I Think Therefore I Am Dangerous

Source: Flickr. Creative Commons.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University Of California Los

Part 1: M8. Assignment: Aquinas & God’s Nature

Thinkers in the Medieval Period were preoccupied with problems surrounding the existence of God. Thomas Aquinas is justly famous for enumerating five proofs for God’s existence. But he also claimed that because of those proofs, there are things we can rightly know about the nature of God. From those proofs he says we can understand two things about God’s existence. And from those two things, we can flesh out even more knowledge about Him.

In this assignment carefully give a detailed explanation those two initial bits of knowledge. And then explain them further as Aquinas does. Aquinas claims we can retain the mystery surrounding God’s nature and yet have a glimpse of what he actually is. Do you believe Aquinas argument permits us to see God in this way? Is Aquinas’ argument sound?

Altar of St Thomas Aquinas

Sculpture of Thomas Aquinas. Source: Flickr. Creative Commons.

Submission:

  • Must be a minimum of 1 1/2 pages with standard 1-inch margins in Times New Roman or Garamond font.
  • Must be double-spaced.
  • Must address the topic of the paper with critical thought.
  • Must include in-text citations and references in MLA style. No outside sources.
  • Name, course, and assignment top left.
  • Include a Title.

Part 2: M8. Discussion: What was God Doing Before he Made the World?

Topic

What was God doing before he made heaven and earth?

Augustine raises that interesting question as he considered the differences between his Manichean religion and Christianity. His answer revolutionized our idea of time. We talk about time all the time, but when we stop to think about it, what do we mean when we talk about present time? How long is the present? How long is a long time? Discuss some of the main ideas Augustine arrived at in relation to time. In the end, what is God’s relation to time and how should we think about the terms past, present, and future? How does that view compare with what we now know of the universe thanks to images from the Hubble telescope? Are Augustine’s thoughts about time consistent with the images we see in the video below?

Source: Origin of the Universe 101. National Geographic. You Tube. 1 March 2018.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University Of California Los

Part 1 Assignment The Stories of Chuang Tzu

As we learned with Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, philosophy has much to do with logic and argumentation to get to the truth about various issues we all face. Asian Philosophy also relies on logical reasoning as for example with the Nyaya school of Hinduism, and in China, The School of Names and the Mohists. But both the Greeks and the Chinese also harbor philosophers who believed that language gets in the way of thinking better. They used humor instead. The Greek philosopher who is a master of comedy and repartee is Diogenes, the Cynic. He used his quick wit to ridicule the mindless and arrogant, including Alexander the Great. The Asian master of wit and storytelling is the Daoist, Zhuangzi (sometimes spelled Chuang-Tzu).

Zhuangzi is a master storyteller and he uses that talent to teach important moral and philosophical lessons. The video below (Flight from the Shadow) is an example of the type of teaching he engaged in. Our text offers three additional examples: Nie Que’s conversation with Wang Ni; Huizi and Zhuangzi about gourds; the story of Cook Ding (sometimes called Butcher Ding); and the story of Wheelwright Pian. Even though the lessons are in story form, that doesn’t mean that they are easy to decipher. One reason for this is that the stories probe deep into human nature and the essence of what we are as persons.

So the assignment this week, while easy to read, takes some thinking on your part. Give a short synopsis of each of the four stories mentioned above. Then given what you learned about Daoism in the text, give your view of the wisdom Zhuangzi is trying to impart. What do you think he means in each case? And taken together what do you think Daoism is trying to teach us?

Submission:

  • Must be a minimum of 2 1/2 pages with standard 1-inch margins in Times New Roman or Garamond font.
  • Must be double-spaced.
  • Must address the topic of the paper with critical thought.
  • Must include in-text citations and references in MLA style.
  • Name, course, and assignment top left.
  • Include a Title.

Cullen Vance. The Stories of Chuang Tzu. EP 1: The Flight from the Shadow. YouTube. 16 June 2015.

Part 2 : Discussion The Vinegar Tasters

Topic

What can the three great Asian philosophers tell us?

There is an old story about the meeting between Confucius, Laozi, and the Buddha in which they all taste a bit of vinegar. Each of them reacts to the vinegar in a different way, and the way they do reflects their philosophy of life. From the video shown here and from the chapter reading, briefly explain what you understand to be their individual philosophy. Now imagine living a life that holds to their principles. Their claims are that to live in the way they suggest is to live a better, wiser life. Pick three ideas they express and discuss why you think holding to these principles might enhance and enrich your own life.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University Of California Los

Exercise 1 (3+3 points)

Consider the dierential equation

x_ = (x .. 6)(x .. 1)2:

(a) Draw the associated phase portrait and graphically deduce the stability of the

xed points.

(b) For t 0 draw the graph of the solution…

… x1(t) with x1(0) = 2;

… x2(t) with x2(0) = 5;

… x3(t) with x3(0) = 7:

2

Exercise 2 (3+3 points)

For r > 0 and x > 􀀀1 consider the dierential equation

x_ = rx 􀀀

x

1 + x

:

(a) Find all xed points and draw the bifurcation diagram.

(b) What type of bifurcation occurs and what is the bifurcation point?

Exercise 3 (3+3 points)

Let f : R ! R be a dierentiable function with continuous derivative. Suppose the

dierential equation x_ = f(x) has precisely two xed points x1 < x2:

(a) Suppose the xed point x1 is semi-stable and the xed point x2 is a stable. Can

a solution x(t) with x(0) < x1 approach the xed point x2?

If yes, please provide an example. If not, please explain why.

(b) Is it possible that both xed points x1; x2 are unstable?

If yes, please provide an example. If not, please explain why.

4

Exercise 4 (3+3+3 points)

For a parameter r 2 R consider the dierential equation

x_ = r + ex

(a) Let r 0. Show that every solution x(t) with x(0) > 0 blows up in nite time.

(b) Draw the phase portrait for r 0: Do solutions x(t) with x(0) < 0 also blow up

in nite time?

(c) Draw the bifurcation diagram for r 2 R: Describe the type of bifurcation.

Exercise 5 (3+3 points)

(a) For x > 􀀀3 consider the dierential equation

x_ = x4 􀀀 1 + (1 􀀀 x4) ln(x + 3):

Compute all xed points and use linear stability analysis to determine their

stability.

(b) Let f : R ! R be an innitely often dierentiable function. Let x be a xed

point of the dierential equation x_ = f(x) with f0(x) = 0 and f00(x) < 0:

Determine the stability of x. Brie

y explain your answer.

Exercise 6 (2+4+1 points)

For r < 0 and x > 0 consider the dierential equation

x_ = ..

1

x

+ rx + 2:

(a) Calculate the unique bifurcation point (r; x):

(b) Approximate the ODE near the bifurcation point and use a normal form to

classify the bifurcation.

Specify the order of the approximation as an error in ” > 0 and the corresponding

scalings of r; x; e.g. jx .. xj < “:

(You do not need to change coordinates.)

(c) Draw the local bifurcation diagram near (r; x):

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Hello, I have a philosophy paper about Avicenna. PLEASE ANSWER QUESTIONS 1, 2, and 4 ONLY. Below I will attach some documents with notes that may be useful. Please message me if anything!

Check List

1. General Advice to Consider

You wrote this paper in your natural voice and didn’t mimic a sort of academic/formal way of writing

you set your imaginary reader as a smart non-philosophy major such as your high school history teacher or your brilliant physicist grandma. (this should be taken with a grain of salt though)
you minimized the use of jargons, and, when they are used, they are (mostly) from the course material and you tried to define them.

2. Introduction

I avoid clichéd starters, e.g., “Since the beginning of time, philosophers have pondered…” and “The dictionary defines ‘virtue’ as…”
I have given the reader a brief road map of what to expect in my paper.
I have a thesis statement that tells the reader the main objective of my paper.

page5image1563269552page5image1563269840

I have stated my thesis clearly and succinctly.

All of my sentences are precise and necessary for the advancement of my thesis.

3. Body of the Paper

I start each paragraph with a topic sentence, i.e., a sentence that highlights the point of the paragraph.
If I have provided a quotation or paraphrase,

it is properly cited.
I have explained the idea(s) presented.
I have explained the importance of including it.

My argument is valid.
I provide strong evidence for each premise in my argument.
All of my sentences are precise and necessary for the advancement of my thesis.

4. Conclusion

I have briefly restated my thesis and outlined how my argument supports the thesis.
I have not raised any new issues regarding the points discussed in my paper. All of my sentences are precise and necessary for the advancement of my thesis.

5. Revision

I have proof-read my paper twice.
There are no grammatical errors.
I have included all the information relevant for responding to the prompt, e.g., for every question in the prompt, I have explicitly provided an answer.
I have included my student ID number but not my name.
I have formatted my paper according to instructions (e.g., page-limit, font, line-spacing, etc.)
All of my sentences are precise and necessary for the advancement of my thesis.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

what is your religion

WHAT:

In class we defined religion as a system of belief. It is a broad definition to include everyone in the discussion and it also does not create arbitrary advantage or disadvantage in a conversation. This brief assignment is meant to apply that definition to you. What is your real religion? That is, what is it that guides all of your choices and decisions on a daily and long-term basis.

HOW:

  • The religion of your family might be your religion, but chances are they might have just given you values for reference. In other words, if major decisions are dictated by the rules of your faith, then ok, that might be your actual religion
    • But you may have modified it on a personal level; discuss how you have personalized it
    • Maybe you are a member of a sect which is different from other sects, please discuss
    • Maybe you added something you heard or may have been influenced by current trends; how might you have made your practice of that religion slightly different or unique
  • Maybe you thought you don’t have a religion of the traditional type, but you do have a way of making decisions; in other words, there is something which usually takes priority when making important or even casual decisions.
    • Try to figure out what that “priority” might be; maybe it is pleasure/fun; or, financial success; or, the joy of learning, etc.
    • In other words, when an important decision presents itself, how do you decide? Is it by what is safest, cheapest, funnest, holiest?
    • You can try to test yourself by what your decisions have been over the past
    • For example: Football can be your religion if you plan your entire year around the football schedule.
  • THEN discuss how or why this “principle” or religion might change for you in the future.

WHY:

Because religion is just a system of beliefs, everyone has religion; everyone has a set of values which explains the choices that person makes. The more you are comfortable with understanding your own, the easier it is to understand the religion of others. In other words, why people do what they do, becomes easier to understand.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University Of California Los

Journal Topic

Consider the following topic for this week’s journal entry:

Read this article by John McWhorter on Aeon (Links to an external site.) about how much about English is ‘not normal’. Then think about what we have studied thus far with respect to phonetics, phonology, morphology and syntax, and how English is similar to and different from other languages. Do you agree with his arguments? Give detailed points about your position.

Instructions

  • Post your initial post by Thursday of this week. Your response should be 100-150 words in length, and you should connect the elements in the journal topic to our course in some way. You should also include your personal experiences, tying them into the course.
    • You won’t be able to see anyone else’s post before you write your own—and that’s on purpose. Use this time to reflect on your experiences. Remember that there are ‘no wrong answers’—so long as you use the information that we have learned thus far in the course to your work, then all is good!
  • Between Friday and Sunday, please reply to at least two of your colleagues’ posts. Useful comments include engaging in dialogue, reflection, or suggestion. If you find that you agree with a given response and have nothing else to add, then I challenge you to reply to someone who has a different perspective than yours, and explore the differences.
  • Optional: If you have any helpful resources, feel free to share them in your posts/replies.

Classmates posts:

1

In his article, John McWhorter brings up many very intriguing points about the history of the English language and how it accounts for the ‘strangeness’ of our language today. He explains how different words in English were formed, and compares them to words in Old English, Celtic languages, and foreign languages such as Spanish and French. I agree with most of his arguments after reading the article, but I did not know a lot of what he explained. I liked his argument about the tenses/moods used in the English language. A large part of learning Spanish has been getting genders and tenses right, which as a native speaker of English, I would naturally think it strange. However, reading this article, I now understand that it is English, not the other European languages that are strange.

2

I’ll admit that prior to my first linguistics class, I considered English as the language that was the most ‘normal’ to me. After all, it is my primary language and I’m most fluent in it; most of my understanding of the world is constructed with English. As I’m most familiar with English, I came to regard other languages as ‘not normal’, based on how it’s aspects were different in comparison to English. I just spoke English the way I was taught, never questioning peculiarities such as, why there were different words for expressing the same idea in varying degrees and the roots of words. I agree with many of McWhorter’s arguments on the strangeness of English, despite my initial belief that English is the most normal and the easiest language to learn. Unlike most other languages, whose words are typically derived from earlier versions, the English language is described as “muttley’ and “mongrel’, a mishmash of other languages such as Old English, Old Norse, French and Latin. English is truly a polyglot language in the sense that it’s comprised of so many other languages. Many people consider English as simple when in reality it’s complexity and weirdness is because it’s influenced by so many other languages each with their own unique rules and ways. 

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized

University of California Los

Journal Topic

Consider the following topic for this week’s journal entry:

Read the BBC article about how various speech communities in Africa feel that English dominance, due to colonization (and its aftermath), has created an identity crisis (https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-57093347 (Links to an external site.)). Reflect on how this could connect with our discussions and readings on languages in contact. If you or those you know have felt similarly, and if you feel comfortable doing so, add it to your discussion.

Instructions

  • Between Friday and Sunday, please reply to at least two of your colleagues’ posts. Useful comments include engaging in dialogue, reflection, or suggestion. If you find that you agree with a given response and have nothing else to add, then I challenge you to reply to someone who has a different perspective than yours, and explore the differences.
  • Peer response:
  • I think that the fact that English is creating an identity crisis has been present in not only this story, but many countries all over the world. I feel that in some aspects, its because many cultures and countries view English as a superior language that provides you with a future. They hold English at a higher level then even their languages, which then placed the label of dumb, or inferior upon those who don’t speak that added language. I’ve noticed through personal experience that many countries do this. I can understand how this can conflict somebodies mind and provide them with an identity crisis
  • Peer Response
  • Taking into account the example of the Lasinki, in “Languages in Contact”, the situation of Khahliso sounds familiar where “She changed languages depending on who she was talking to.” This reminds me of a very painful situation that I had one day while walking with my daughter, who was 8 years old at the time, one day in the park we took a walk and we spoke in Spanish, because my daughter and I always speak in Spanish. Then a Caucasian man started saying racist words to us and demanded that we speak in English. of course I confronted him, with the little knowledge of English I had at that time, to which he made fun of my accent. My daughter was scared but she defended me and told him that we in our family always we communicate in Spanish and when required, we used English. It was really a very bad experience for us, but fortunately we did not give it much importance and we continued with our lives as we always had. And I recognize that I will always keep my accent when speaking English because it is my second language and I started studying it just 6 years ago. My daughter is now 23 years old and she is a fully bilingual girl and she speaks, writes and reads Spanish and English with almost perfect fluency. I really would not like to be in the same situation again, much less reach the extremes that occur in Africa, as a mother I would not like to be in the place of African parents who have to endure these situations on a daily basis.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

Posted in Uncategorized