i need to reply to this A similar bend in procedural law is to overextend your pleadings, which are intended to be quot;short and plain…

i need to reply to this

A similar bend in procedural law is to overextend your pleadings, which are intended to be “short and plain statements.” Loweringthebar.com had another article about a case seen by US District Judge William Pauley in which the plaintiff submitted a paragraph complaint with of exhibits. The defendants in this case replied with a 1,answer including 12 counterclaims. When asked to amend their pleadings, the defendants returned with a larger document including 1,. According to the article, they were still arguing over their pleadings a year later. I would say this charade was completely ineffective and dragged out a process that could have been much simpler. The Judge did not throw the case out. In UPS v. Thomas Hagan, UPS ended up being awarded $1MM for a variety of complaints including unpaid royalties, fees, and shipping services. If I were on either side of this case I would be extremely disappointed in my attorney. Especially the defendants, who came back with the exact opposite of what the judge asked for. I can’t imagine the time and legal fees associated with drafting a document with that much information, and I feel that may be an abuse of billable hours.

Judge Criticizes “Behemoth Pleadings”

UPS Store, Inc. v. Hagan. United States District Court, S.D. New York. March 24, 201599 F.Supp.3d 426

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