Harvard University Sexual Iss

Based on the week’s readings (see attached) and the video below, comment on an aspect of the topic that was interesting or important to you. Be as reflective as possible in your remark, from both a scholarly and personal perspective. Include your own personal reactions in addition to an academically based (bio-, psycho- and/or social) perspective.

In addition to your comment on the reading, provide a reference and brief discussion of either:

  1. A current news story related to sexuality (reproduction, gender, sexual orientation, sexual politics etc.)—because this topic is based on the week’s news, it does not have to be directly relevant to the class topic for the week …or…
  2. A resource (website, article, book, film, video, etc.) that IS related to something in this week’s topic/readings, with brief discussion that is clinically useful/relevant.

Please respond to two peers:

1. In this week’s Buehler chapters, I appreciated the insight into assessing and understanding sexual problems. Particularly interesting was the conceptualization of sexual relations (and consequent issues) in terms of “ecosystems”, outlining the various layers of ideas, beliefs, opinions, experiences, etc. that shape one’s relationship with sex. I also enjoyed the deep-dive exploration of sexual issues pertaining to men and women, individually, and where these problems could be stemming from (biological, psychological, cultural/social), as well as the step-by-step interventions for each. The chapters suggested the exploration of one’s own body and sexuality, which I feel like is a given to many of us; however, through numerous conversations with friends (even ones of different cultural backgrounds), I was surprised how often it is that people delve into sex with others before exploring their own bodies – no shaming here, I just always assumed that was the “first step” to sexual pleasure!

I feel like this tied well with the chapters in Passionate Marriage, where Schnarch speaks to the emotional bond of sex and suggests stepping away from the physical mechanics of the act to achieve sexual intimacy and passion. He also discusses how other-validated intimacy can have some drawbacks in the long run because it relies on partners making us feel better about ourselves (again, similar to the point of sex with others vs exploring one’s self). Schnarch also touches on the fact that sex may be shaped by society and culture, and that sexual desire is shaped by the numerous abovementioned factors, thus making it very complex.

2. One thing that stood out to me during this week’s reading was Buehler’s emphasis on the importance of conducting sexological ecosystemic assessments with clients. This is an important part of therapy as each client holds different beliefs in religion, might have received misinformation about sex from peers, or had a lack of information from school or their family of origin. Each of these factors can influence the way the client views sex or could be the reason behind their underlying sexual issues. Another thing that stood out to me about the reading this week was how influential the attitude our family has towards sex or how they addressed the subject can be on our personal sex lives. Because of this, it will be important that we help our clients experiencing sexual issues in identifying the experiences in their life that might have led to these issue developing as well as provide them with psychoeducation on the importance of sexual exploration to begin treating their sexual dysfunction.

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Harvard University Sexual Iss

Based on the week’s readings (see attached chapter), comment on an aspect of the topic that was interesting or important to you. Be as reflective as possible in your remark, from both a scholarly and personal perspective. Include your own personal reactions in addition to an academically based (bio-, psycho- and/or social) perspective.

In addition to your comment on the reading, provide a reference and brief discussion of either:

  1. A current news story related to sexuality (reproduction, gender, sexual orientation, sexual politics etc.)—because this topic is based on the week’s news, it does not have to be directly relevant to the class topic for the week …or…
  2. A resource (website, article, book, film, video, etc.) that IS related to something in this week’s topic/readings, with brief discussion that is clinically useful/relevant.

Please respond to two peers:

1. One of the things that stood out to me is when Buehler (2017), stated that not addressing sexual problems with teen clients could lead to various mental illnesses such as depression, eating disorders or substance use. To be honest, that was never something that crossed my mind as a potential cause for mental illness. I assumed that if sexual issues came up it would only be when working with couples, but not individual clients and definitely not with teens. However, I do feel that it is an important topic to talk about with clients.

The topic of sexuality can be very taboo in some families, including mine. Sexuality and sexual issues is not something I ever heard my family talk about. I am thankful that despite my extended family’s beliefs, my mom was very open minded about it and actually took the time to talk to me. She would answer any questions I had, and even spoke to me about safe sex. However, I realize now that her views on sex were very biased and heterosexually oriented. I hadn’t minded it before because it wasn’t an issue for me, but when my sister mentioned she was bisexual it made me think about how she probably needed more or a different education on safe sex. This also brings up the fact that there is just not enough and very biased education on safe sex. As future clinicians, we need to be more knowledgeable and aware of our biases to prevent ourselves from making assumptions and ensuring that we give the best possible care.

2. In the book by Buehler, I appreciated the focus on helping therapists gain the necessary knowledge around sexual health in order to be successful in their therapeutic practice. To me, there is probably no other topic than sex that would stir up countertransference issues given that most of us have been brought up with sex-negative bias and/or have had sexual trauma of some sort. The author describes countertransference with the term “vicarious traumatization” as a therapist’s inner experience as a result of his or her empathetic engagement with and responsibility for a traumatized client (p.7). And for a therapist by discussing sexual issues/health with a client might trigger internal issues causing distress and ultimately avoidance of the issue. And if left unobserved or addressed, the therapist is sending a message to the client that talking about sex is not ok. Ultimately leaving an important part of a person untouched. Buehler goes on to describe a four-step process by which therapists can address their viewpoints on sexuality and how to create awareness from the client’s point of view.

I was raised in a South Asian family where the topic of sex is taboo at best. Girls are supposed to remain virgins until marriage otherwise families are looked upon with shame and dishonor. I never got the “sex talk” – but the “your body is a temple and I have to protect it from men” statement. Lucky for me I went to an all-women’s college where I learned firsthand about sexuality and all its various forms. There was no shame on campus and it was cooler to be sexually self-actualized than not. Despite a more bold and open college experience I still have a background rooted in traditional Indian views of sex and the same and stigma it brings upon women that I will need to address and work on.

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Harvard University Sexual Iss

Based on the week’s readings (see attached), comment on an aspect of the topic that was interesting or important to you. Be as reflective as possible in your remark, from both a scholarly and personal perspective. Include your own personal reactions in addition to an academically based (bio-, psycho- and/or social) perspective.

In addition to your comment on the reading, provide a reference and brief discussion of either:

  1. A current news story related to sexuality (reproduction, gender, sexual orientation, sexual politics etc.)—because this topic is based on the week’s news, it does not have to be directly relevant to the class topic for the week …or…
  2. A resource (website, article, book, film, video, etc.) that IS related to something in this week’s topic/readings, with brief discussion that is clinically useful/relevant.

Please respond to two peers:

1. The chapter that stuck out to me most in this week’s Buehler reading was Chapter15 Sexuality and Medical Problems. Buehler writes, “even a minor flu can change a relationship dynamic.” It’s true that even something as common as a cold or temporary stomach ache can be hard to manage in a relationship. I know I can annoy my partner when I’m not feeling good for a day, so I could only imagine how experiencing chronic illness or serious medical problems could deeply impact relationship dynamics. I was surprised to learn that 88% of women with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) report experiencing sexual problems, and it made me think about how this is such a taboo topic, yet so many women are dealing with similar problems. What makes it even more of a complex issues is a lot of the medication given to women to alleviate symptoms of CFS contributes to low sexual desire. This puts people who want relief in a difficult position, and I’m sure can be extremely frustrating, As medicine progresses, so do options for improving the sex lives of people dealing with medical problems. The book does good work by diving deep into this critical issue.

2. In this week’s reading of Buehler, I was both saddened and disgusted by the chapter on sexuality and illness and the chapter on STIs. It is amazing to me how health care providers do not address sexual issues when illness is present. They must know the effects, why are they so hesitant to talk about it? If even the doctors do not talk about these issues, it creates further stigma about sex and patients might never ask and continue to suffer in silence. It is important to talk about these things but this is the reality for people suffering from an illness.

The chapter on sexually transmitted infections was thought provoking. I was not disgusted in the sense of being turned off by the thought of a sexual partner having an infection/disease, but rather how terrible it must be to live with untreatable sexual diseases. Because of the tremendous effects such diseases can have on body image and self esteem, psychotherapy should be a place to address those concerns and form a life with better coping skills. As clinicians, we have the responsibility of creating an environment where clients can be accepted as they are and feel comfortable talking about their sexual concerns.

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Harvard University Sexual Iss

Based on the week’s readings (see attached), comment on an aspect of the topic that was interesting or important to you. Be as reflective as possible in your remark, from both a scholarly and personal perspective. Include your own personal reactions in addition to an academically based (bio-, psycho- and/or social) perspective.

In addition to your comment on the reading, provide a reference and brief discussion of either:

  1. A current news story related to sexuality (reproduction, gender, sexual orientation, sexual politics etc.)—because this topic is based on the week’s news, it does not have to be directly relevant to the class topic for the week …or…
  2. A resource (website, article, book, film, video, etc.) that IS related to something in this week’s topic/readings, with brief discussion that is clinically useful/relevant.

Please respond to two peers:

1. One of my goals as a professional is to work with children. While I have thought about possible topics that may come up in therapy such as anxiety, stress over transitions, family issues and so on, sex was not a topic that had occurred to me as being an important issue in working with children. However, Buehler points out that it is important for therapists to help parents become comfortable with having these conversations with their children. For many parents this could be an uncomfortable topic, or they may not really know how to approach the matter because no one ever did it for them. There is also a misconception that if parents talk to their children about sex then they are encouraging them to start having sex, but that is not at all true. Instead being able to talk to a child about sex could potentially make them more comfortable to later ask any concerning questions about their bodies, and later practice safe sex. One of the main things that concerns me though, is if a child asks questions during sessions but the parents are not okay with having that conversation. In that case I wonder what the proper way to address those situations would be.

2. One of the things I learned during this week’s Buehler’s reading is how many couples have the misconception that their partners have to know what they want or like sexually or must want to have sex as frequently as they do or else it means they’re not attuned to them. However, it is important to remember that our partner’s cant read our minds so we must vocalize what we want as everyone has different sexual drives, preferences, and turn-ons. Another thing I found interesting about the reading was the three stages of love: being in love, passionate love, companionate love. This stood out to me because while many couples become disillusioned with their relationships when their love evolves, it is important to remember that this doesn’t mean the relationship isn’t working anymore it just changed. Lastly, while Buehler presented several ways to resolve these sexual issues, such as having couples schedule sex, engaging in novel activities, trying tantric sex, or exploring open or polyamorous relationships, it will be important as future clinicians that we encourage couples to listen to each other as one of the primary cause of these issues can be the lack of communication.

Place this order or similar order and get an amazing discount. USE Discount code “GET20” for 20% discount

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