Eastern Kentucky University Weapons of Mass Destruction Research

Question Description

you have to follow the instruction I uploaded here

Research paper:

Your final paper is a research paper that you should be working on steadily over the

course of the entire semester. The first paragraph of your paper must contain a clear and

coherent claim in the form of “In this paper I will argue….” Or “The purpose of this

paper…..” Each student will write a short essay (8 -10 pages, double-spaced (12 point,

1”) that analyzes one case of conflict in global politics. The research paper will provide

an overview of the key actors, historical events, and issues in the conflict. The student

should integrate relevant class readings and info into his or her analysis in order to offer

insights on how to resolve the conflict, or perhaps at least to suggest concrete steps that

could move the conciliation process forward.

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World Politics Term Paper—Suggested Topics and Instructions The purpose of the term paper is to evaluate your competence in applying theoretical constructs and approaches used in the study of World Politics to the analysis of issues, processes, and events in the world. This document provides a list of sample topics for the term paper. Students who wish to select topics from this list are welcome to do so. Those who wish to write the paper on different topics not in the list are required to write a one-page paper outline and submit it by the date of the midterm. Following the list of topics there are general instructions on how to write a successful term paper. A. Suggested Topics for the Term Paper • The superpowers and the effects of superpower intervention on conflict and cooperation in the world • Revolutionary state formation and international conflict—the effect of state formation on war outbreak in the world • The effect of universal ideologies on world politics • The theory of war • A comparative analysis of decision making in crises: Are there cross-cultural differences in how leaders make decisions at times of crisis? Comparing decision making processes • The relationships between civil wars and international wars in the Middle East: the Syrian war (2011- now) Yemen civil war (now), the Lebanon civil war (1974-87), and the Algerian civil war (1989-1998) • The impact of the Arab-Israeli conflict on the world • The sources of World Alliances—did states balance or bandwagon? • The reliability of alliances—why did allies fulfill/fail to fulfill their treaty obligations. • The enemy of my enemy is my friend. Does this principle apply to patterns of alliance formation in the World? • The effect of leadership on world politics: how did individual leaders shape patterns of discord and collaboration among states • Is there a relationship between economic downturn and war in the world? • The economic incentives of peace: how did economic factors affect conflict resolution efforts in the world? • Sources of world terrorism. How and why did some groups decide to become terrorists in the Middle East • Can the liberal peace apply to the Middle East? • Democracy, Radical Islam, and international cooperation in the World? Can the three coexist? • How did wars shape the political structures of regimes in the World? • Weapons of Mass destruction 1. General Structure of the Paper The paper is based on the application of a specific theoretical topic covered in the class discussions and the readings to one or more historical cases, issues, or aspects of world politics. A good structure of the paper is the following a. Introduction. The introduction lays out the specific research questions, the context of the paper (e.g., national movements, conflict theory, political economy, alliances and international organizations, etc.), and provides a brief overview of the paper. In general, it is a good idea to write the introduction at the end after you have finished the research and spelled out your findings and conclusions. This way, if the paper has a central theme, it is useful to point it out at the outset. b. Theory. This section lays out the theoretical framework that guides the case study. It discusses the relevant theoretical literature and derives from it a set of hypotheses that are researched in the next sections. c. Narrative of the Historical Case/cases. Brief description of the facts and the historical processes you are studying. Be sure to discuss the actors, the problems, and the facts that are relevant to your analysis, and not provide unnecessary information. d. Analysis. This section applies the concepts, approaches, ideas, and methods entailed in the theory you are using on the historical case/cases. Be sure to relate the analysis of the case to specific hypotheses that you had specified in the theory section. The key question here is whether and how do the facts of the case either support or contradict the hypotheses. Also, it is useful to say something about if and how the theory helps explain seemingly inexplicable aspects of the historical case. e. Conclusion. This section summarizes your findings and whatever other conclusions you derived from the research. You can also point out shortcomings or advantages in the theory on the basis of your study of the case. If there are policy implications, please mention them. Technical Matters Bibliography and references (5 Sources). Be sure to use sources and cite them correctly. Use the APSA style for citations and references. Look up any of the APSA journals (American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, etc.) Double-spaced (12 point, 1”) Style. Spend some time thinking on how to organize your paper, how to present your arguments, how to support them, and how to conclude. A well written paper makes for a better grade than a poorly written one. Questions. I encourage creativity in writing, but to be on the safe side, check with me any ideas that you think are not really of a standard form that you want to put in your paper Good Luck APSA Style Guide for Citations and References Any information that appears in your paper and that is not your own requires citation. This includes direct quotes, as well as paraphrases of information and general ideas. One easily implemented system is the American Political Science Association’s (APSA) parenthetical citation system, in which source information is provided in the text in parentheses. Typically, the citation, which appears in parentheses right after the direct quote, paraphrase, etc., includes the last name of the author(s), year of publication, and page number. For example: “Interest groups are among the prime shapers of public policy in the United States. They contribute vast amounts of money and personnel to political campaigns” (Segal and Spaeth 1993: 240). The format is exactly the same even if it is a paraphrase rather than a direct quote: Organized interests play a very active role in the development of policy in America, most notably by promoting the election of candidates for office (Segal and Spaeth 1993: 240). ***Note that, unless there is something particularly special about the language of the direct quote, paraphrasing is more desirable.*** When a citation is to a work as a whole rather than something appearing on a particular page or pages, the page number can be omitted. This should be a very rare occurrence, however. For example: There is substantial disagreement as to whether interest group amicus curiae participation influences the decision making of Supreme Court justices. Some have provided empirical support for their influence (Kearney and Merrill 2000), while others have concluded no relationship exists (Songer and Sheehan 1993). Page numbers can also be omitted when they do not exist; e.g., an article published only on a website. When a citation is to a legal case, include the italicized case name in the text, followed by the year the case was decided in parentheses. For example: In Mapp v. Ohio (1961), the Supreme Court applied the exclusionary rule to the states. When you are directly quoting a Supreme Court case, list the case citation in parentheses, as well as the page number that corresponds to the quote. For example: Writing for the Court in Mapp v. Ohio (1961), Justice Clark stated that, in applying the exclusionary rule to the states, the Court “gives to the individual no more than that which the Constitution guarantees him, to the police officer no less than that to which honest law enforcement is entitled, and, to the courts, that judicial integrity so necessary in the true administration of justice” (367 U.S. 643, at 660). Remember that there should be a corresponding entry in the Works Cited section for each work cited in the body of the paper. The Works Cited Section The Works Cited section should appear at the very end of the paper. It should include complete citation information for all works cited in the body of the text, listed in alphabetical order by author. No items other than those specifically referenced and used in the body of the paper should appear in the works cited section. Any information that 1 was taken from a work should be included in the Works Cited section and should also appear as a parenthetical citation. Article from a journal, single author List the author’s name, last name first. The year of publication appears next, followed by the title of the article (in quotation marks) and the name of the journal (in italics). The volume number should come next, followed by the issue number (or month) in parentheses, with the page numbers of the article appearing last. Aldrich, John H. 1980. “A Dynamic Model of Presidential Nomination Campaigns.” American Political Science Review 74(September): 651-669. Article from a journal, more than one author List the first author’s name, last name first, followed by the second author’s name, first name first. The year of publication appears next, followed by the title of the article (in quotation marks) and the name of the journal (in italics). The volume number should come next, followed by the issue number (or month) in parentheses, with the page numbers of the article appearing last. Hillerman, Anthony, and John McPhee. 1997. “A New Model of the World.” American Political Science Review 78(September): 111-145. Article from a magazine List the author’s name, last name first. The year of publication appears next, followed by the title of the article (in quotation marks) and the name of the magazine (in italics). The month of publication should come next, with the page numbers of the article appearing last. Prufer, Olaf. 1964. “The Hopewell Cult.” Scientific American, December, 13-15. Article from a newspaper List the author’s name, last name first. The year of publication appears next, followed by the title of the article (in quotation marks) and the name of the newspaper (in italics). The month of the publication should come next, followed by the day, month, and year of publication. Cuff, Daniel F. 1985. “Forging a New Shape for Steel.” New York Times, 26 May 1985. Book, single author List the author’s name, last name first. The year of publication appears next, followed by the title of the book (in italics). The city and state of publication should come next, followed by the name of the publisher. Kessel, John H. 1968. The Goldwater Coalition: Republican Strategies in 1964. Indianapolis, IN: Bobbs-Merrill. Book, more than one author List the first author’s name, last name first, followed by the second author’s name, first name first. The year of publication appears next, followed by the title of the book (in italics). The city and state of publication should come next, followed by the name of the publisher. th Sourauf, Frank J., and Paul Allen Beck. 1988. Party Politics in America. 6 ed. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman. Chapter in an edited volume List the name of the author of the chapter, last name first. The year of publication appears next, followed by the title of the chapter (in quotation marks) and the title of the book (in 2 italics). The name of the editor of the book appears next, followed by the city and state of publication and the name of the publisher. Hermann, Margaret G. 1984. “Personality and Foreign Policy Decision Making: A Study of Fifty-Three Heads of Government.” In Foreign Policy Decision Making, eds. Donald A. Sylvan and Steve Chan. New York, NY: Praeger. Legal References List the full case citation. The case name comes first, followed by the citation; finally, list the year the case was decided (in parenthesis). Mapp v. Ohio, 367 U.S. 643 (1961). Website List the author’s name, last name first. The year of publication (if noted on the website) or the year of access if no year of publication is available appears next. The title of the article (in quotation marks) appears next, followed by the complete URL. The last date on which the item was accessed appears last in parentheses. Collins, Paul M., Jr. 2005. “Data Management in Stata.” http://www.polsci.uh.edu/pmcollins/Seminar%20on%20Data%20Management%20in%2 0Stata.pdf (August 8, 2006). Note that **all** material appearing on the web has an “author.” If there is no particular individual listed as author, then the author is the sponsor of the website (e.g., American Civil Liberties Union). Likewise, all material appearing on the web has a “date of publication.” If there is no date indicated, then the date is the date of last access. Note, too, that print materials that are located on the web (e.g., The New York Times online, an article from an academic journal found via JSTOR) follow the format corresponding to their original print source, not that for websites. 3 …

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