discussion reply 44

250 word reply with reference

Response

  • Ron sees the textbook as the curriculum he is to teach. He says “I feel a responsibility to do this. Experts decided that this textbook was the most important. And who am I to say that it is not so?” Ron uses media and various instructional strategies to help students learn what is needed to do well on state tests.
  • For the first example, the fifth grade teacher, Ron, felt as though he needed to use the textbook because the textbook is filled with information provided by experts in the field. Textbooks are valuable resources to use to teach the information but the textbooks should not be the only resource to use while teaching a lesson as the textbooks often loose the students’ interest and engagement. Not only is he using the textbook to teach the students the lesson but the teacher is also integrating technology. “Like all other fields, geography is changing, with more emphasis on environmental studies. Changes in technology now aid geographers in their work” (Chapin, 2013, p. 207). The integration of technology engages the students and promotes class participation.
  • Even for her fifth graders, Kim wants her students to be aware of how historians go about their work. She looks for primary sources, even though they have to be short and within the understanding of her students. Her class identified the Declaration of Independence as a primary source document. They spent days going over the meaning of the various parts of the document with an emphasis on why the particular ideas were there and what was left out.
    • For the second example, Kim understands the value of the students knowing and understanding what historians do and how they retrieve their information. Kim also recognizes that the students will not stay engaged and will lose interest if the source that she presents is too long. The Declaration of Independence is an excellent resource to present to the class so they not only learn the importance of historians’ roles in our society but also the history and importance of the Declaration of Independence in our country and what exactly the document means. The ways in which the teacher presents the information and the activities that he or she incorporates is important. Technology, hands on activities and visual activities are necessary (Chapin, 2013). An assessment at the end of the lesson is imperative to ensure that the students have fully comprehended the information (Chapin, 2013).
  • Sue has set up an economic simulation of life in Virginia. She hopes that, in the debriefing time and afterward, students will identify economic problems that the nation is facing today.
    • Simulations are a great class exercise to incorporate into any classroom. “Simulations are learning activities that present an artificial problem or event. The situation described tries to duplicate reality but removes the possibility of injury or risk” (Chapin, 2013, p. 90). Simulations allow the students to role-play a situation or a way of life that allows the students to become engaged and participate in a hands on activity (Chapin, 2013).
  • Ron sees the textbook as the curriculum he is to teach. He says “I feel a responsibility to do this. Experts decided that this textbook was the most important. And who am I to say that it is not so?” Ron uses media and various instructional strategies to help students learn what is needed to do well on state tests.
  • For the first example, the fifth grade teacher, Ron, felt as though he needed to use the textbook because the textbook is filled with information provided by experts in the field. Textbooks are valuable resources to use to teach the information but the textbooks should not be the only resource to use while teaching a lesson as the textbooks often loose the students’ interest and engagement. Not only is he using the textbook to teach the students the lesson but the teacher is also integrating technology. “Like all other fields, geography is changing, with more emphasis on environmental studies. Changes in technology now aid geographers in their work” (Chapin, 2013, p. 207). The integration of technology engages the students and promotes class participation.
  • Even for her fifth graders, Kim wants her students to be aware of how historians go about their work. She looks for primary sources, even though they have to be short and within the understanding of her students. Her class identified the Declaration of Independence as a primary source document. They spent days going over the meaning of the various parts of the document with an emphasis on why the particular ideas were there and what was left out.
    • For the second example, Kim understands the value of the students knowing and understanding what historians do and how they retrieve their information. Kim also recognizes that the students will not stay engaged and will lose interest if the source that she presents is too long. The Declaration of Independence is an excellent resource to present to the class so they not only learn the importance of historians’ roles in our society but also the history and importance of the Declaration of Independence in our country and what exactly the document means. The ways in which the teacher presents the information and the activities that he or she incorporates is important. Technology, hands on activities and visual activities are necessary (Chapin, 2013). An assessment at the end of the lesson is imperative to ensure that the students have fully comprehended the information (Chapin, 2013).
  • Sue has set up an economic simulation of life in Virginia. She hopes that, in the debriefing time and afterward, students will identify economic problems that the nation is facing today.
    • Simulations are a great class exercise to incorporate into any classroom. “Simulations are learning activities that present an artificial problem or event. The situation described tries to duplicate reality but removes the possibility of injury or risk” (Chapin, 2013, p. 90). Simulations allow the students to role-play a situation or a way of life that allows the students to become engaged and participate in a hands on activity (Chapin, 2013).

References:

Chapin, J. (2013). Elementary social studies: A practical guide(8thed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.

ISBN: 9780132697156

References:

Chapin, J. (2013). Elementary social studies: A practical guide(8thed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.

ISBN: 9780132697156

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