complete 2 piblic speaking tasks

TASK 1:

Persuasive Speech

Your final project, the persuasive speech, is your opportunity to take a stance on a topic of interest and support your viewpoint. This final presentation represents the culmination of smaller assignments. Consider:

The topic itself. What is the issue, who are the stakeholders, and why is this important to you? And… why should it be important to us?

Your topical outline. What do you plan to tell us? What evidence do you plan to share, to convince us that your side is right in this debate? MAKE SURE TO TYPE THE OUTLINE

What did you learn from the devil’s advocate? How can you use their propaganda against them – so that your argument is even stronger?

What tips will you use to make a ‘great’ persuasive speech? How can you use visual aids?

And finally, what will you ask the audience to do once you’ve persuaded them that your viewpoint is the most logical/sensible? Will your concluding thoughts resonate with them?

TASK 2:

Informative Speech

It’s time to take what you’ve learned from all of your prior presentations and add an element of research to create your Informative Speech. You have to be cautious when choosing an Informative topic, as it’s easy to think an Informative Speech and a Persuasive Speech as the same thing. However an Informative Speech JUST provides information. The most basic informative speech is the kind that teaches us (much in the way the Demonstration Speech taught us) something detailed about a topic with which we are already familiar. For instance, we know George Washington was our first President, but a lot of people don’t know much about his life prior to the military or serving in office. That would make for an interesting Informative Speech.

With an informative Speech, you’ll want to establish credibility by referencing and citing your materials. For example: “In the July 13, 2007 edition of the New York Times, John Smith said that George Washington suffered from depression as a young boy.” It is critical that you discuss where you found your information in order to maintain your credibility.

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complete 2 piblic speaking tasks

TASK 1:

Persuasive Speech

Your final project, the persuasive speech, is your opportunity to take a stance on a topic of interest and support your viewpoint. This final presentation represents the culmination of smaller assignments. Consider:

The topic itself. What is the issue, who are the stakeholders, and why is this important to you? And… why should it be important to us?

Your topical outline. What do you plan to tell us? What evidence do you plan to share, to convince us that your side is right in this debate? MAKE SURE TO TYPE THE OUTLINE

What did you learn from the devil’s advocate? How can you use their propaganda against them – so that your argument is even stronger?

What tips will you use to make a ‘great’ persuasive speech? How can you use visual aids?

And finally, what will you ask the audience to do once you’ve persuaded them that your viewpoint is the most logical/sensible? Will your concluding thoughts resonate with them?

TASK 2:

Informative Speech

It’s time to take what you’ve learned from all of your prior presentations and add an element of research to create your Informative Speech. You have to be cautious when choosing an Informative topic, as it’s easy to think an Informative Speech and a Persuasive Speech as the same thing. However an Informative Speech JUST provides information. The most basic informative speech is the kind that teaches us (much in the way the Demonstration Speech taught us) something detailed about a topic with which we are already familiar. For instance, we know George Washington was our first President, but a lot of people don’t know much about his life prior to the military or serving in office. That would make for an interesting Informative Speech.

With an informative Speech, you’ll want to establish credibility by referencing and citing your materials. For example: “In the July 13, 2007 edition of the New York Times, John Smith said that George Washington suffered from depression as a young boy.” It is critical that you discuss where you found your information in order to maintain your credibility.

“Order a similar paper and get 20% discount on your first order with us Use the following coupon “GET20”